1. blackhenbluesky

    blackhenbluesky New Egg

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    Nov 27, 2014
    My Pet black Australorp is spitting out blood! I was watching her and her new egg she layed and then she stuck her head through a hole in the fence and when she pulled her head back in she had a white diamond shaped paper like object and ate it!!! Then she started sneezing and coughing and she shook her head when she sneezed and spit out a string of blood! Is she going to be ok? What should I do to help???[​IMG]
     
  2. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive True BYC Addict

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    Welcome to BYC. You would have to figure out if eating the object caused this episode or if it might be a respiratory disease such as infectious laryngotracheitis or ILT. How big was the object she swallowed? Was she or anyone else showing sign s of a respiratory disease beforehand? ILT is a virus which causes gasping, coughing, sneezing, and wheezing, and bloody mucus may be coughed up from the beak. Here is some information about it:

    Infectious Laryngotracheitis

    Synonyms: LT, ILT, trach, laryngo
    Species affected: Chickens and pheasants are affected by LT. Chickens 14 weeks and older are more susceptible than young chickens. Most LT outbreaks occur in mature hens. In recent years, LT has also caused significant respiratory problems in broilers greater than 3 weeks of age, especially during the cooler seasons of the year. This is believed to be due to unwanted spread of LT vaccines between poultry flocks.
    Clinical signs: The clinical sign usually first noticed is watery eyes. Affected birds remain quiet because breathing is difficult. Coughing, sneezing, and shaking of the head to dislodge exudate plugs in the windpipe follow. Birds extend their head and neck to facilitate breathing (commonly referred to as "pump handle respiration"). Inhalation produces a wheezing and gurgling sound. Blood-tinged exudates and serum clots are expelled from the trachea of affected birds. Many birds die from asphyxiation due to a blockage of the trachea when the tracheal plug is freed (see Table 1).
    Transmission: LT is spread by the respiratory route. LT is also spread from flock to flock by contaminated clothing, shoes, tires, etc. Birds that recover should be considered carriers for life. LT may be harbored in speciality poultry such as exhibition birds and game fowl.
    Treatment: Incinerate dead birds, administer antibiotics to control secondary infection, and vaccinate the flock. Mass vaccination by spray or drinking water method is not recommended for large commercial or caged flocks. Individual bird administration by the eye-drop route is suggested. Follow manufacturers instructions. In small poultry flocks, use a swab to remove plug from gasping birds, and vaccinate by eye-drop method.
    Prevention: Vaccinate replacement birds for outbreak farms. Vaccination for LT is not as successful as for other disease, but is an excellent preventive measure for use in outbreaks and in epidemic areas. Refer to the publication PS-36 (Vaccination of Small Poultry Flocks) for more information on LT vaccinations.
     
    Last edited: Nov 27, 2014
  3. blackhenbluesky

    blackhenbluesky New Egg

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    Nov 27, 2014
    Thank You for this advice!

    To be honest I have noticed that my hen, Smoki has been rather quiet lately, but she always makes a racket when she lays an egg so I guess it's normal. The object she swallowed was bigger than her beak! she held on to one end with her beak and choked it down. After that she started coughing, sneezing, and finally did a weird head shake and spat blood everywhere, after that she remained quiet and was starting to puff her feathers up, also she did have a raspy yet gugly breath. I don't believe it's LT though but if it is then what medications do you recommend, and also if she did swallow something sharp what should i do?

    Thanks![​IMG]
     
  4. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive True BYC Addict

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    ILT is a virus, antibiotics won't help to stop the virus, but they can help to prevent secondary bacterial infections. Tylan, oxytetracycline, and Gallimycin are some of the antibiotics used. It is a reportable respiratory disease in most areas which can make carriers of the flock. I would confine her to a cage with food and water, and watch to see if she has more bleeding, or is passing stools normally. Can you feel anything in her crop?
     
  5. blackhenbluesky

    blackhenbluesky New Egg

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    Nov 27, 2014
    UPDATE:

    I woke up this morning and found Smoki standing still and her eyes were shut and she was very fluffy. I was petting her and gave her some water and offered her food, but she didn't eat any. I think at night she spit out more blood because her comb is very pale. I moved her into the sun and noticed her nostrils were very wet and a little red? She stood up after I moved her and walked a bit before she collapsed she is now "sleeping" in the grass. I can't check because my parents told me not to touch her because she's "sick", but as soon as i can I will check her crop.

    How am I supposed to check the crop, do I just feel it?
    Also, her poop has been diarrhea and sometimes solid

    I think she's going to die....[​IMG]
     
    1 person likes this.
  6. LittleRedCoop53

    LittleRedCoop53 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I just read this thread... chicken are pretty tough creatures, hopefully she'll pull through.... sorry you are going through this. [​IMG]
     
  7. blackhenbluesky

    blackhenbluesky New Egg

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    Nov 27, 2014
    UPDATE:

    Thank you to everyone who took their time to view this post and thank you to


    Sadly, Smoki has passed away. She was walking to another spot to sleep, and then she suddenly collapsed and started to shake. She then started to roll and spit blood everywhere. I saw this and came running outside and she suddenly stopped and collapsed again. I looked at her and she was still, she took a few last breaths and was gone....
    So Thank you to everyone who read this and offered advice! I'm not trying to be a drama queen with all that stuff I posted above^
    But honestly it may sound cheesy, but enjoy every moment you have with your pets or anyone, because you never know when they'll just disappear from your life.

    Rest In Peace my good friend & only hen,
    Smoki

    [​IMG] [​IMG]
     
    1 person likes this.
  8. blackhenbluesky

    blackhenbluesky New Egg

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    Nov 27, 2014
    Thank you! [​IMG]
     
  9. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive True BYC Addict

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    southern Ohio
    So sorry for your loss. I believe if you can do it, that I would perform a necropsy on her to look inside her crop, proventriculis, and gizzard to find the object the she ate, in case that it was indeed what caused the bleeding. Also be on the lookout for other chickens showing any signs of ILT--coughing, sneezing, wheezing, gurgling, bloody mucus from the beak. Here is a diagram to show you the chicken anatomy:

    [​IMG]
     
    1 person likes this.
  10. LittleRedCoop53

    LittleRedCoop53 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Oct 20, 2012
    Southern Oregon
    Oh no...i'm sure sorry to hear that... you should get your parents to help...i don't know how old you are but you did mention them... i'm hoping it was that object, sorry to say, better that then some sickness :( i'll be watching for an update.
     

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