Helping Chicks Through Cocci

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by TehLizardKing, Nov 21, 2013.

  1. TehLizardKing

    TehLizardKing Chillin' With My Peeps

    248
    7
    81
    Jul 29, 2012
    Lincolnshire
    Hey guys, sorry in advance in case I do anything wrong... I havn't been on this marvellous forum for ages and i'm probs a bit rusty [​IMG].

    I have 3 Cream Crested Legbars, 1 Amber Star and 1 Legbar X Amber, all about five weeks old, living in the house at the mo. They are almost ready to go out into the shed, and so on Wednesday I took them out for their first little poddle around in the garden. I scrupulously cleaned the garden of huge globs chicken poop and other 'dangerous' things that the chicks could kill themselves on, and shut the rest of the flock away within watching distance. After half an hour of leaping around and munching bugs they were looking chilly, so I decided to bring them back in and warm them up by the fire.

    Yesterday I noticed that Penny, one of the legbars, was fluffed up, hunched over and looking generally ill. There was no discharge, her poop looked fine, she was normal weight and her crop was half full. I thought she may have just eaten something that hadn't agreed with her, as she was fit as a fiddle and leaping around only hours before, so I decided to wait and see what happened.

    Well this morning, to my dismay, two more of the chicks were looking exactly the same as Penny, and there was a rather strange looking runny poop in the corner of the pen. I decided I should probably wipe it up before they all stepped in it. I'm pretty sure time stopped for a minute when i looked down at the tissue and saw a few little blobs of mucus and blood.

    It's obviously Coccidiosis. The symptoms match perfectly and it does seem possible that they have picked it up from their adventure on Wednesday. I just didn't know it acted so fast. I've been doing everything in my power to help the poor girls and guys. I've even cooked them some scambled egg and mushed up some chick crumb with warm water, and they have eaten a little bit, but Penny literally only had one mouthful. I asked my parents if we could go to the vet, but they are too busy (and obviously cold-hearted [​IMG]). Three of the chicks are looking bad now, one is obviously affected but not as badly as the others, and one (Clementine, the Amber) looks pretty much fine. I tried to seperate her, but they wouldn't stop alarm calling and I didnt want to stress them out any more. I've looked around all of the pet shops and feed stores I know of and they don't sell anything to treat cocci. Anyway I've ordered some Corid off Amazon with Express Delivery (adding £12 to the original price) but it still wont be here until the day after tomorrow. I fear I am too late thanks to my lousy parents. To be fair, I guess, they do have things to do, but I can't understand how they can sit idly by and watch these poor chooks suffer.

    I wondered if there is any chance of them surviving since I won't be able to start treatment until Saturday? I will [​IMG] and send them loads'a lurve.

    Thanks y'all.
     
  2. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

    29,283
    3,319
    491
    Apr 3, 2011
    southern Ohio
    Are you in the UK? Coxoid is available there probably through a vet. If you can get some buttermilk mixed with a little chick feed into them, it might buy some time. Sulfadimethoxine and sulfamethazine are also used to treat coccidiosis.
     
  3. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

    29,283
    3,319
    491
    Apr 3, 2011
    southern Ohio
    It helps to give young chicks a gradual introduction to coccidia by putting a patch of sod or soil in their brooder early on. That way they aren't overwhelmed with it suddenly out on the ground. They gradually build up immunity over several weeks.
     
    Last edited: Nov 21, 2013
  4. TehLizardKing

    TehLizardKing Chillin' With My Peeps

    248
    7
    81
    Jul 29, 2012
    Lincolnshire
    Thanks Eggcessive... [​IMG] Yeah I am in the UK. Btw they seem to be a little better... they have all eaten a bit and aren't as lethargic. I was wondering if there is an easy way to get them to open their mouths to syringe food in. I tried rubbing their throats and wings (didnt think it would work but it's good with pigeons) but I didnt want to just prise their beaks open... I'm not at the syringing stage yet but I want to be sure of how to do it just in case they decide to stop eating. Also could you give me an idea of how long the coxoid takes to start working... it would be very helful.

    Thanks for the help so far! [​IMG]
     
  5. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member

    57,201
    12,538
    751
    Jun 24, 2012
    My Coop
    I just pry their beaks open when I give medications of tube feed. Be very careful if you syringe feed as aspiration is a very real risk, way riskier than tubing.

    -Kathy
     
  6. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member

    57,201
    12,538
    751
    Jun 24, 2012
    My Coop
    FYI, the Corid products I have seen have instruction for cattle, not poultry, but this is what I found (sorry, it's for gallons, not liters).

    For Poultry
    The severe outbreak dose (.024%) for Corid Powder is 1.5 teaspoons (4.536) grams
    The severe outbreak dose (.024%) for Corid liquid is 2 teaspoon.
    The moderate outbreak dose (.012%) for Corid Powder is 3/4 teaspoon (2.268 grams).
    The moderate outbreak dose (.012%) for Corid liquid is 1 teaspoon.
    The. 006% dose for Corid Powder is 1/3 teaspoon (1.134 grams).
    The .006% dose for Corid liquid is 1/2 teaspoon.

    For Cattle
    The treatment dose (.012%) for Corid Powder is 3/4 teaspoon (2.268 grams).
    The treatment dose (.012%) for Corid liquid is 1 teaspoon.
    The preventative dose (. 006%) for Corid Powder is 1/3 teaspoon (1.134 grams).
    The preventative dose (.006%) for Corid liquid is 1/2 teaspoon.

    Powder instruction for poultry
    Dosage Level Mixing Directions

    0.024% Dissolve 8 ounces of AMPROL 128 20% Soluble Powder in about five gallons of water in a 50-gallon medication barrel. Stir, then add water to the 50 gallon mark. Stir thoroughly.
    0.012% Follow same directions as above but use 4 ounces of AMPROL 128 20% Soluble Powder.
    0.006% Follow same directions as above but use 2 ounces of AMPROL 128 20% Soluble Powder.
    My twisted math for the .024% level
    If 8 ounces (28.35g x 8 = 226.8 grams) are needed for 50 gallons, then 1/50 of that is needed for 1 gallon, right? So that would be 226.8 grams divided by 50 = 4.536 grams per gallon. (doing this as I type, so correct me if I'm wrong, please!)


    FDA recommendations:
    http://www.accessdata.fda.gov/scripts/animaldrugsatfda/details.cfm?dn=013-149
    "Chickens
    Indications: For the treatment of coccidiosis.
    Amount: Administer at the 0.012 percent level in drinking water as soon as coccidiosis is diagnosed and continue for 3 to 5 days (in severe outbreaks, give amprolium at the 0.024 percent level); continue with 0.006 percent amprolium-medicated water for an additional 1 to 2 weeks."


    And this link has these instructions:
    http://www.drugs.com/vet/amprol-9-6-solution-can.html
    "Poultry - as Soon As Caecal Coccidiosis Is Diagnosed, Give 0.024% Amprolium In The Drinking Water For 5 To 7 Days. Continue The Treatment With 0.006% Amprolium Medicated Water For An Additional One To Two Weeks. No Other Source Of Drinking Water Should Be Available To The Birds During This Time."

    Powder to Liquid conversions
    1/2 teaspoon of 20% powder = 2.8125ml of 9.6% liquid - Both have 270mg of amprolium.
    3/4 teaspoon of 20% powder = 4.21875ml of 9.6% liquid - Both have 405mg of amprolium.
    1 teaspoon of 20% powder = 5.625ml of 9.6% liquid - Both have 540mg of amprolium.
    1.5 teaspoons of 20% powder =8.4375ml of 9.6% liquid - Both have 810mg of amprolium.
    1.75 teaspoons of 20% powder = 9.84375ml of 9.6% liquid - Both have 945mg of amprolium.
    2 teaspoons of 20% powder = 11.25ml of 9.6% liquid - Both have 1080mg of amprolium.

    There's more here:
    https://www.backyardchickens.com/t/818879/updated-corid-and-amprol-amprolium-dosing

    Please, double check it and let me know if I made an error! [​IMG]

    -Kathy
     
  7. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

    29,283
    3,319
    491
    Apr 3, 2011
    southern Ohio
    The coxoid (amprollium) should start working by the second day. You might try dropping a spoonful or two onto some chick feed to wet it. Dipping their beaks into the water is a safe way to get them to drink. It's more important to drink right now than eat. After the Coxoid, probiotics and vitamins in the water would be helpful to replace healthy bowel bacteria and vitamin A lost.
     
  8. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member

    57,201
    12,538
    751
    Jun 24, 2012
    My Coop
    Interesting, I did not know that Coxoid was amprolium, thanks for that info!

    -Kathy
     
  9. mi2bugz

    mi2bugz Chillin' With My Peeps

    277
    6
    81
    Sep 8, 2013
    Waxahachie, tx
    Can probiotics be given when the chicks are being treated for cocci?
     
  10. TehLizardKing

    TehLizardKing Chillin' With My Peeps

    248
    7
    81
    Jul 29, 2012
    Lincolnshire
    Thanks guys [​IMG], you're helping loads. It took me ages to do the maths to work out how much i needed to dilute for a tiny chick drinker [​IMG]. I've started meds and am hoping for the best [​IMG]. Btw two of the chicks are looking almost fine now, although still a bit of blood in poop. They are all obviously getting better slowly but I'm gonna still carry on with medication. The others need it and I can't imagine it would hurt to make sure all those oothscs are killed off in the healthy guys.

    Thanks again ya'll!!!!
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by