helpp!!!

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by srussler, Jan 21, 2015.

  1. srussler

    srussler Out Of The Brooder

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    One of my 20week old chickens almost got its leg ripped off by a dog yesterday. I have it wrapped to its body holding it in place right now and is isolated. There is a large open wound. I am wondering which is better to put on. Vetericyn or blue kote?
     
  2. DylansMom

    DylansMom RIP 1969-2017

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    Vetericyn appears to be recommended for wound cleaning, but contains no antibiotics to prevent infection. I would spray with vetericyn and then apply triple antibiotic ointment to prevent infection. I think blue kote is generally used just to discourage them from picking at a wound because the red color attracts their attention while the blue/purple color of blue kote does not.
     
    Last edited: Jan 21, 2015
  3. azygous

    azygous Chicken Obsessed

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    Did you clean the wound real well? You need to do that at least twice a day. Infection has probably already set in. It doesn't take long.

    Go do that without waiting around. Use soap and warm water. Do not put Blu-kote on it. If you have the Vetericyn, spray the cleaned wound with that every time you wash and clean the wound. Smooth anti-biotic ointment on it. Leave it uncovered until you've provided us with more information.

    Keep the chicken in a clean environment away from the others.

    Please give us the following information:

    Where is the wound located, exactly? Where on the leg? Feather part or scaly part?
    How big is it?
    Is the wound a clean cut or jagged tear?
    How deep does it go? What do you see? Fat? Bone?
     
  4. srussler

    srussler Out Of The Brooder

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    We purchased blue lotion topical spray. I talked to a vet technician dvm who raises chicken and she said to spray with that solution then neosporin spray and baby asprin crushed with water in a syringe. The wound is in the feathery part up were the "armpit" is like is was almost ripped off. it's more clean edged then jagged and I see fat or meat. I didn't want to pull it so far open to look in. She is eating,drinking and bowels are working. Also urinating. I will post a pic later when my husband gets home I can't hold her and take a photo at the same time.


    We purchased
     
  5. srussler

    srussler Out Of The Brooder

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    I have it wrapped up to the body so it isn't dangling.
     
  6. azygous

    azygous Chicken Obsessed

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    Have you washed out the wound thoroughly, though? I understand how you need to keep the leg from dangling, but that will provide an environment for bacteria to grow if it's not clean.

    If the leg has been almost severed, has a vet looked at it? Is she in danger of losing the leg? Has the vet recommended any other treatment? A photo is definitely needed.

    How long is the wound? Is it half of the width of the leg? If you don't see bone, the wound may not be as serious as you first thought. Chickens can recover from serious wounds if they are kept clean and free of infection. Even a day without cleaning the wound can allow infection. That will kill your hen in just a couple of days. An all purpose antibiotic would be a good idea during this initial period, at least for the next week or ten days.

    Is she drinking water?
     
  7. srussler

    srussler Out Of The Brooder

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    Yes, she is drinking and yes the wound has been cleaned. We are going to put tbe blue lotion on as soon as my husband gets home and off work. The bone is not showing. I am pretty sure that will be able to heal. She has not seen a vet. I don't know which vets in my area see poultry. I believe it is about 2inches wide. I will get a photo as soon as i can. I don't want to try by myself . I am afraid i could hurt her more.
     
  8. azygous

    azygous Chicken Obsessed

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    Two inches is not terrible. Chickens heal incredibly fast with good care, but you have to stay on top of it.

    I had a chick who suffered a terrible wound when she was scalped by a rooster. The entire back portion of her head was gone. There was just a cavity. I didn't see how she would live until the next morning, let alone grow a new cap on her head.

    I had excellent instruction by a chicken keeper who rescues roosters. I was told to NEVER allow the wound to dry out. I found out just how critical this small detail is when after around the third week I got careless about washing the wound and putting ointment on it. I let it dry out and it stopped healing in its tracks. There was a one centimeter hole that refused to close.

    So I went back to twice daily wound care, washing it with peroxide and then putting antibiotic ointment on it. In two more weeks the hole had completely closed. She had taken six weeks to grow a new cap of skin on her head, no small feat. She now looks like Woodstock, the Peanuts character because feathers don't grown smoothly on the back of her head, but she has 'em!

    Your girl will heal, too. I would quit covering the wound, though. Bacteria can too easily grow under a bandage. What I would try to do, and I did try with my chick but her skin was too fragile, is to get ordinary needle and thread and put just two stitches across the wound. That will hold it closed without completely shutting it. That way her natural body defenses can still work to eject bacteria by oozing fluid. No, it won't hurt her the same as it does us. She probably won't even wiggle.

    To recap, and it's non-optional: wash/flush the wound twice daily with hydrogen peroxide or warm soapy sterile water and rinse. KEEP MOIST with antibacterial ointment. Since this was a dog bite, there's a high danger of infection. If you have any antibiotic like amoxicilin, give her one dose, 250mg daily.

    Do those things, and you can rest easy knowing you've covered all the bases. She should be good as new in a month or so.
     
    Last edited: Jan 21, 2015
  9. srussler

    srussler Out Of The Brooder

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    Thank you so much. It really means a lot that you took the time to tell me all of that. I am not so much covering the wound but holding the leg so it doesn't dangle down. The wound is on top of the leg (hip area) and that tissue that is ripped would be holding the leg in place. Do you think I should leave it unwrapped even though the leg would be falling down? I sprayed the blue lotion and neosporin. There are so puncture wounds underneath (armpit) but thoseare tiny so should heal okay with neosporin. I Trimmed the feathers and got all the dried blood out of the way. I will rinse with peroxide tomorrow morning. Shes a very good bird she laid on her side the whole time and let me work for about 30min until she was done. Her leg is definitely broken in the joint and upper leg so that is all spinted as well.[​IMG]
     
  10. azygous

    azygous Chicken Obsessed

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    When you say, "The leg is broken", do you mean a complete break, or is the bone halfway broken and protruding through the skin - compound fracture? Can she stand on the leg? Can she walk? I thought you said you couldn't see any bone. If it's broken, then it must be an enclosed fracture if you can't see bone.

    If it's just the tissue that is "broken", that isn't what's holding the leg on. Tendons and muscle tissue under her flesh are what hold the leg in place and allow it to work. The leg bone may not be broken at all.

    What are you using to "splint" the leg? Vet wrap? If you're sure the bone is broken, not just the flesh that is torn, here's a "how-to" on treating a bone break. https://www.backyardchickens.com/t/659231/how-to-treat-a-broken-leg Use the link to a diagram of a chicken's skeletal structure provided in the essay to picture what your hen's leg looks like. It will make it easier to know what your are doing.

    It's really hard for me to picture with just the small amount of information you've provided.

    Have you tried to suture the wound yet? You can do this! There are so few chicken vets around, all of us end up knowing more about treating chickens than most vets that haven't got a clue about poultry.

    What is the "blue spray" you said you put on the wound? Is it Blu-kote? Do not put Blue-kote on the wound. Use Vetericyn and antibacterial ointment (Neosporin) only.
     
    Last edited: Jan 22, 2015

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