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Hen attacked by dog and survived, what do I do now?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Hammerj, Aug 7, 2011.

  1. Hammerj

    Hammerj Out Of The Brooder

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    One of our hens was attacked last Wednesday morning by a dog. Her tail feathers were pulled out and it appears some flesh is missing from her hiney. It looked like raw hamburger [​IMG] We sprayed the wound area with iodine and put her in a rubbermaid tub with newspaper in the house to keep her in a sterile environment. We considered putting her out of her misery, but our little girls wouldn't have it. She perked up after about 48 hours and is now eating and drinking and pooping. Damage is deep, but doesn't seem to involve internal organs. It is now black and crusty, no maggots visible.

    It is now Sunday and she is still living in the house. My daughters are taking her outside for a little in the afternoons to get some fresh air and exercise. Our chickens free range during the day and our rooster ran her off this afternoon.

    My questions are.....when should we put her back with the flock and will they let her back in? Will her tail feathers grow back? This is our first experience with chickens and we are loving every minute of it, except for this incident.
     
  2. jjthink

    jjthink Overrun With Chickens

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    Topical neosporin on the wound. Deep wounds may need oralor injectible antibiotic, not just topical.

    If internal bleeding is not suspected, aspirin water will help with pain (one 81mg baby aspirin crushed into one cup drinking wtaer, fresh batch twice daily ideally).

    Extra nutrition for healing. Avia Charge 2000 is a great all round supplement and is added to their water - I give it every day except once a month when I give ACV [apple cider vinegar] in water instead. Some folks use Rooster Booster. Both available on line. Mealworm treats will give welcome extra protein. Sunflower seeds. Eggs. It takes extra energy to heal and to grow feathers.

    I would only allow supervised visits with the other birds until the wound is nearly healed. It's a good idea so they don't become disacclimated but monitor very very closely.

    JJ
     
  3. jjthink

    jjthink Overrun With Chickens

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    Your tail feather question - hard to say, but they will likely grow back. I've had dogs attack my birds (thankfully no losses) and the feathers all grew back. Speaking of dogs, I hope you know who the dog 'owner is and can take action to discouarge repeat incidents.

    JJ
     
  4. Miss Lydia

    Miss Lydia Running over with Blessings Premium Member

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    Quote:Do not put her back till healed up, chcikens are relentless and will peck her wound and maybe even kill her, continue to keep her wound clean and free of maggots, [that is very important. If you can set her up a somewhat clean inviroment close to the others but where they can't get to her, then by all means do it it will make her transition back easier. The only thing you have to worry about if you keep her outside is the flies getting to it. But you can get stuff at the feed store to put on her to keep them off. When she has healed resonably I mean scabbed over real good, maybe try to let her out in the yard with the rest, where you can watch how they act, and be ready to intervene if need be. Her feathers will come back but maybe not till she molts. Chickens are wonderful at healing, but not so good at leaving each other alone if there is a wound or sickness. There is a product called Blue-Kote that is great for healing and for disquising, you might want to pick some up it's very inexpensive , spray her bottom with it and then put her with the rest, sometimes it disquises it so good they don't even noticed she has a wound, others it doesn't faze so you'll just have to try. your Rooster picked up on her being hurt and different thats why he ran her off. It could have been worse.
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Aug 7, 2011
  5. Hammerj

    Hammerj Out Of The Brooder

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    Thank you for your responses! I was able to pick up some of the items you mentioned this afternoon. We have moved her to a cage that we can keep her in and keep her close to the other chickens yet stay clean and safe from pecking. She loved the meal worms! Unless she develops an infection, I think she will make it. She seems much happier after spending time outside.

    [​IMG]
     
  6. allieloveschickens

    allieloveschickens Chillin' With My Peeps

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    sounds like you are taking good care of her! Chickens are remarkable healers, your girl will be better in no time [​IMG]
     
  7. Miss Lydia

    Miss Lydia Running over with Blessings Premium Member

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    Quote:great news keep us updated..
     
  8. Hammerj

    Hammerj Out Of The Brooder

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    Lucy (the injured chicken) is still living in the cage, in the kitchen, but is doing MUCH better. A really big scab fell off, or she pulled it off, today and the wound looks really healthy. It is pink and appears much more normal looking. She gets supervised visits with the rest of the flock in the afternoons when we get home from school. They still chase her around, re-assimilation will take some time. I will keep her in the cage in the coop once the wound is completely healed.

    Lucy has become quite the house pet. She greets me each morning when I come into the kitchen to make our coffee. I refuse to cook chicken for dinner until she is back outside. There is just something about her looking at me...[​IMG] while I cook!

    Thank you all so much for your advice, I am sure that is what made the difference for her! [​IMG]

    These chickens are a 4H project for my 10 year old daughter, and I have been completely sucked in!
     

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