hen dung as fertiliser

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by paddyg84, Feb 19, 2014.

  1. paddyg84

    paddyg84 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Does hen dung work well as fertiliser for a veg patch? Have been told its too strong.
     
  2. MEMama3

    MEMama3 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Strong isn't the word I'd use. The term is "hot". Fresh manure can burn plants, but if you age it for 6 months it's better than any other kind of manure. Someone on my local board uses fresh along the sides of her beds (not too close to the plants) and has great luck. I personally just do two piles going.
     
  3. paddyg84

    paddyg84 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thanks good advice
     
  4. Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner Chicken Obsessed

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    Look up composting. That can be as easy as piling the chicken manure and other stuff up and waiting for it to rot or you can actively work it, turning the pile regularly. That means more work but it breaks down a lot faster. Either way that’s great stuff for a garden.

    Another trick is to clean out your coop in the fall after the garden is finished and spread that stuff on your garden. In the spring you just till that in and you are good to go.
     
  5. paddyg84

    paddyg84 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Well i have one cobtainer thats a few months old already so will get it in the veg patch now as we are a few months off planting. Keeping hens is so rewarding. Even the one job of cleaning up poo has benefits!
     
  6. MEMama3

    MEMama3 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Just an important note (sadly from personal experience): Do not use anything but VERY OLD manure of any species on carrots or parsnips. They can absorb the flavor and that is a total bummer at harvest to discover.
     
  7. Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner Chicken Obsessed

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    That's another reason to compost. Fresh manure can sometimes cause problems with the crop. For example, fresh uncomposted manure can cause scab on potatoes.
     
  8. chikntender

    chikntender New Egg

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    When I clean out the hen barn, I always toss the hay/manure mix on my gardens. Most of it is old, but some, of course, is fresh. Since I put it on in the late winter/early spring it has a chance to age further. Then I let the chickens in to dig it in and spread it around. I've never been bothered with any potato scab or any such problems, and my squashes and hot peppers thrive--unless the deer get to them.
     
  9. MEMama3

    MEMama3 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I have a two bin setup in my run. One is open and one is closed. The open one is where I put food scraps, used bedding, etc and the birds are allowed to scratch away in it. In the fall it gets blocked off and we open the second one. In the spring I use the compost from the first bin in my garden. When it's used up I leave it open and close off the second. The stuff in the second one will be ready for fall topdressing in the garden.

    Did that make any sense???
     
  10. paddyg84

    paddyg84 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Yeh that makes sense. The only container old enoigh has been sealed tho. Will have to try snd compost it further.
     

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