Hen finished being broody, now plucking others' feathers... What do I do?!

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by Sunflowergirl, Dec 21, 2012.

  1. Sunflowergirl

    Sunflowergirl Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I have an 8 month old Wyandotte hen that just got over being broody about a week and a half ago. I had tried to break her but she was more determined than me, so I let it run its course on some golf balls. I finally figured out that she is the one who is plucking feathers out of 3 other Wyandottes and 2 EEs just above their tail, on the back. (I thought it was my roo being over-zealous!)
    I checked under her back feathers and she has none of the downy fuzz. She has a ton of pin feathers coming in! Did she molt or did she pull out all her fuzz being broody on the nest?
    I am now making sure she is getting some more protein. Also have just ordered some FORCO to feed her. Do I need to separate her from the rest? She has pulled out some plugs of feathers on my poor EEs! I am not finding any blood yet. Do I just need to just keep an eye on the other girls?
    I greatly appreciate ANY wisdom anyone has to share!!!
     
  2. sourland

    sourland Broody Magician Premium Member

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    It may have started as a desire for more protein since she is molting. It can escalate to a very bad habit. If providing protein supplementation does not work you may want to fit her with Pinless Peepers for a while.
     
  3. Sunflowergirl

    Sunflowergirl Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thanks Sourland! I am going to look into those. So, does a molt start with the fuzzy feathers falling out? Did her being broody throw her into a molt?
     
  4. sourland

    sourland Broody Magician Premium Member

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    Broodiness especially for an extended period can be stressful and lead to a molt.
     

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