Hen had a prolapsed vent a week ago, fixed that, and she laid 4 eggs over the course of 4 days. Thr

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by denisegarrett32, Mar 4, 2017.

  1. denisegarrett32

    denisegarrett32 Out Of The Brooder

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    Apr 20, 2016
    I have a hen that had a prolapsed vent about a week ago. I cleaned her up and gently pushed it back into place. Kept her isolated for a few days in the basement. She did great...started laying eggs again and rejoined the flock. She is in a small flock of 4 hens. She laid a few more eggs and about three days ago I noticed she had stopped laying again. She has not prolapsed again, but this morning she was acting slower than normal. Still eating and drinking, but not moving as fast as her flock mates. I picked her up and felt around for an egg...there is one there, close to her vent, but she has not laid it yet. Any suggestions?

    She is an olive egger, about 10 months old. She started laying about two months ago and had been a very consistent layer with no issues. She is not over weight. She has been on a layer feed and has access to free choice oyster shell.

    Thank you for any thoughts!
     
  2. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive True BYC Addict

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    Are her shells hard? I would give her a dose of calcium--a Tums, calcium tablet, or crushed egg shells in a small bit of yogurt. If she doesn't lay it soon, I would try to help her pass it.Get her on a heating pad on low or in a warm bathroom after running the shower hot to make it humid. Lubricate her vent with a little vegetable oil. Keep her in a dark room or covered cage for 16 hours a day overnight, and then let her out in light for 8 hours a day. Reduce her feed and protein, and still give her a lot of water. Once she lays the egg, she can go back out with her friends during that 8 hour period every day, just to stay part of the flock. This should cause her to stop laying in a few days, and I would recommend that to let her vent heal. Once she stops laying for a few days, you can stop the dark isolation, since she should stop laying for about 2 weeks or so.
     
  3. denisegarrett32

    denisegarrett32 Out Of The Brooder

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    Her shells have been hard. Right before her vent prolapse she laid two soft shell eggs, but since then they have been hard. I am tying to get her to take the extra calcium now...hopefully this helps! Her poop also smells worse than usual, more runny and less of it too.
     
  4. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive True BYC Addict

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    Sometimes if they are egg bound they can get plugged up, so hopefully, she passes her droppings.
     
  5. denisegarrett32

    denisegarrett32 Out Of The Brooder

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    Update: this morning she has still not passed her egg, her poop is also still diarrhea but very little at a time. Last night I soaked her in a warm bath and dried her. She walks around in the crate panting...could she be trying to pass the egg? I tried to give her a tums crushed up in yogurt but she wouldn't take it.
     
  6. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive True BYC Addict

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    Is she drinking fluids? Some reasons for egg binding are dehydration and low calciums levels. The calcium can be given orally by putting a small piece in the back of her throat. You can get more fluids into her by adding a small amount of feed to a bowl of water, making it soupy. Some will take yogurt better if it is mixed with feed. Just experiment with ways to get her to take it. You also may want to put on a disposable glove, and poke a lubed finger into her vent and tey to move the egg. Hoping you have some success, or try a vet when possible or if available.
     
  7. denisegarrett32

    denisegarrett32 Out Of The Brooder

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    I have not been able to get her to drink this morning. I tried to move the egg with a disposable glove on. I could feel the egg and she was straining like she was trying to pass it. The egg felt like it was being blocked by some tissue though...I'm not sure if this is normal??? There are no poultry vets in our area, that I know of. I have tried mixing some feed and water. I left it in her crate and she seemed interested in it, but hasn't touched it yet...hopefully she will soon!!! I really don't want to lose her, she is a great girl!
     
  8. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive True BYC Addict

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    Sometimes the eggs can become trapped. I would repeat the procedure again later to try and help her pass the egg.
     
  9. denisegarrett32

    denisegarrett32 Out Of The Brooder

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    @Eggcessive I retired helping her pass the egg and it finally happened! Yeah! Poor thing is still panting and won't drink or eat anything, but she did just go through a lot. There was also some blood that came out during the process...I hope I wasn't too rough with her. She pooped a little more diarrhea after I put her back in her crate, but she was straining to do that. Is there anything else I should give her?

    I checked out her egg and cracked it open. The shell was very thin...thank goodness it didn't crack inside of her! In your previous thread you mentioned liquid calcium. Is there a particular brand or place I should go to get it?

    Thank you so much for all your help!
     
  10. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive True BYC Addict

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    That is great. There is liquid calcium at the feed stores, but I would just use some human calcium supplements and crush them. Many also contain vitamin D which is good. Tums and human calcium are fine, and you should have crushed oyster shell available to them to eat as they need it. I think since she is wiped now, I would give her some feed mixed with a lot of water in a bowl to get fluids into her. You van hide the crushed calcium in there.
     
    Last edited: Mar 5, 2017

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