Hen has injury to her comb

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by JennyGood, Aug 9, 2013.

  1. JennyGood

    JennyGood Out Of The Brooder

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    I have a barred rock that found a way to injure her comb. At first the bleeding was minimal and blended with her comb. Not one of the other chickens noticed, so I figured it was ok. I went to check on the about 1.5 hours later to discover the others are now pecking at it. Very carefully, with her eyes and nostrils protected, sprayed some blu coat on it.
    Well, it did the trick except she had a slow, but evident bleed still going on that made the others take notice within a few minutes. So I quarantined her to a large plastic dog kennel in the coop with the rest. (She will be sleeping solo tonight)
    Is there anything else I can do? I have no other way to quarantine her and I heard about chickens treating a rehabbed chicken like a stranger. Am I doing the right thing? This is my first year with my girls.
     
  2. Wyandottes7

    Wyandottes7 Overrun With Chickens

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    I'd keep her isolated. Spraying BlueKote onto her was a good idea. You might want to also try putting some antibiotic cream (without any ingredients ending in "caine") on the comb. The bleeding should stop on its own; I wouldn't try dabbing at it with a paper towel or anything.
     
  3. BantamLover21

    BantamLover21 Overrun With Chickens

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    As Wyandottes7 mentioned, I would isolate her until the injury heals, which shouldn't be long, as chickens heal very quickly. I'd put some antibiotic ointment (none with "caine" ingredients) on the wound, along with blue-kote. If the bleeding continues, you can try sprinkling flour or cornstarch over the wound, and that will help stop the bleeding.

    And yes, when the injured hen goes back with the flock, there will probably be some fighting. But they will work things out in the end, usually with minimal damage.
     
  4. chickiechick2

    chickiechick2 New Egg

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    Aug 9, 2013
    You can buy pine tar in the horse section of tractor supply. Some people put that on the chickens as it stinks and is bitter to the others pecking. It is also very runny and hard to apply. I found if you make it into a salve it works quite well in keeping the others from pecking. First, but some bag balm, also at TS, and put a large spoonful in a dish or empty jar. Add about a quarter tsp or more to make a salve. If you don't have bag balm, you can use Vaseline. Vaseline and bag balm are very soothing to the sores from pecking. The salve you mix will smell bad and taste bad so the others will not want to peck. It won't hurt the chickens. Put this salve on as often as needed. They get a mouthful of this and wont peck.
     
  5. chickiechick2

    chickiechick2 New Egg

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    Aug 9, 2013
    Correction. Add the pine tar to the bag balm to make a salve consistency. 1large spoonful of Vaseline or bag balm to small amount of pine tar . Add enough of pine tar so that the mixture is dark and smells strong. But don't add too much to make it runny. Smear it on to pecked wounds to prevent further pecking. Use as often as needed.
     
  6. chickiechick2

    chickiechick2 New Egg

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    It is always better if you don't remove the injured bird as it starts the pecking order all over again when she is put back. Putting the salve on will deter pecking and give her injury time to heal. But you will have to keep applying so they won't keep picking
     
  7. ten chicks

    ten chicks Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Wrong. Injured chickens always have to be removed. Chickens will peck/pick at a wound until the chicken is dead. Better to have a hen at the bottom of the pecking order,than dead.
     
  8. chickiechick2

    chickiechick2 New Egg

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    Yes it is always best to remove a chicken before serious injury. But if it is just a case of pecking feathers or not really inflicting injury. You can put a distaste ink salve on to help stop the pecking. But ou are right, serious pecking can result in injury or death. In my case, the hen was pecking butts and not inflicting any blood.
     
  9. JennyGood

    JennyGood Out Of The Brooder

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    May 9, 2013
    Southwest Michigan
    I figured to remove her for a couple of reasons. Prevent further damage to her head and face, but also to calm her so her wound would clot. I'm going to flush her wound with veterycin tomorrow and continue quarantine. She will get some time out before I let the rest get out of their beds. She is in a dog crate in the run with them. I am hoping that will keep them familiar with one another. This hen is usually pretty equal with the majority of the girls, not on the bottom of pecking order. Crossing my fingers this will be a smooth process :/
    How quickly do chickens generally heal?
     
  10. BantamLover21

    BantamLover21 Overrun With Chickens

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    Very quickly, especially when the injury is to their comb/wattles. One of my birds once got attacked by a unruly cockerel, suffering severe wounds to her comb and wattles. In less than a week, though, you could barely tell that she had ever been attacked.
     

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