Hen has swollen glands

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by cassandrea01, Oct 6, 2016.

  1. cassandrea01

    cassandrea01 New Egg

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    Jan 27, 2013
    Chino Valley Az
    My hen has swollen glands or lymph nodes or something right under her beak. Its hard for her to breath. She has go breath thru her mouth and she coughs sometimes and her breathing is raspy. She seems to be eating and drinking fine. Any clues of what it is and how to help her[​IMG][/IMG]
     
  2. cassandrea01

    cassandrea01 New Egg

    4
    0
    7
    Jan 27, 2013
    Chino Valley Az
    [​IMG]
     
  3. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive True BYC Addict

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    Apr 3, 2011
    southern Ohio
    She may have a respiratory disease. Can you look inside her throat with a flashlight (have someone hold her still) for any yellow patches or gunk in there? Some other things to rule out would be canker or a tumor. A vet might be of help with antibiotics, if she has a bacterial or mycoplasmal infection. Canker is a protozoan, and is treated with Fish Zole (Flagyl, metronidazole.) Has any other chicken been ill with respiratory or other symptoms? Here is a good link to read about common diseases, and one below about canker: http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ps044


    Oral Canker

    [​IMG]
    Canker is a condition mostly associated with pigeons and is caused by a tiny parasite called trichomonas. This parasite is often spread through contaminated drinking water. The parasite causes a ‘yellow button’ of pus to form in your bird’s mouth. This can stop your bird from eating normally leading to weight loss.

    [​IMG]
    What to look for

    • Weight loss
    • Birds picking up food then dropping it
    • A cheese-like plaque in your birds mouth (see photo)
    • A reluctance to eat
    Treatment

    Treating canker or suspected canker is a job for a vet who will likely prescribe an anti-parasitic medication.
    Prevention

    Ensure that your birds' drinking water is changed daily. Try to keep the drinkers in the chicken house to discourage wild birds from sharing your birds’ water.
     

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