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Hen holding one leg up, sitting frequently, stopped laying,

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by ChickenMcNugget, Apr 7, 2017.

  1. ChickenMcNugget

    ChickenMcNugget New Egg

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    Apr 7, 2017
    So I only had these hens for about 2 weeks now. I lock them in their coop for the night and during the days they are free-ranging a 9000sq.ft fenced yard. Read a lot of stuff from this forum and elsewhere. It is not bumblefoot.

    1) What type of bird , age and weight (does the chicken seem or feel lighter or thinner than the others.)

    Chicken. Isa-brown. Acquired 2 weeks ago from a professional breeder. Vaccinated by a vet etc.

    2) What is the behavior, exactly.

    Limping (avoiding using the right leg), not being active, sitting on the ground, not laying eggs anymore, pooping small quantities and a bit wet, eating well

    3) How long has the bird been exhibiting symptoms?

    3-4 days

    4) Are other birds exhibiting the same symptoms?

    No. I only have one other hen (for now)

    5) Is there any bleeding, injury, broken bones or other sign of trauma.

    Read a lot from the forum. It is not bumblefoot. I gave the foot a bath and cleaned it, seems ok. Wrapped a towel around her to have her on her back and feet up, inspected the foot and the leg by comparing to the other healthy leg, did not notice anything broken, but I am very new to chickens.

    6) What happened, if anything that you know of, that may have caused the situation.

    Unknown, perhaps jumped from the coop stairs and landed bad.

    7) What has the bird been eating and drinking, if at all.

    Is eating well, it is a feed mix for laying hens from the breeder.
    I have also given crushed egg shells. The other hen is doing fine and produces an egg per day.
    This one does not.

    8) How does the poop look? Normal? Bloody? Runny? etc.

    Small quantities and a bit wet

    9) What has been the treatment you have administered so far?

    Cleaned the foot and wrapped in a bandage just to see if it is the foot / ankle.
    Gave a long warm bath in case it is egg bound.
    I put her in the coop with food. Thinking of keeping her there behind bars with food & water.

    10 ) What is your intent as far as treatment? For example, do you want to treat completely yourself, or do you need help in stabilizing the bird til you can get to a vet?

    No vets, I believe in Darwinism in case I am not able to treat it myself.

    11) If you have a picture of the wound or condition, please post it. It may help.

    No pic at the moment, she is just avoiding using the leg a lot, but if the other hen roams to the yard, it will follow slowly, and then eat grass etc. It does go inside the coop for the night by itself

    12) Describe the housing/bedding in use

    Coop for 3-4 chickens with hay bedding. Cleaned daily. The other hen uses the coop as a nest and gives me an egg per day.

    Any next steps appreciated.
     
    Last edited: Apr 7, 2017
  2. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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    Apr 3, 2011
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    Usually if they hold the leg up, it is either sore from a sprain or possibly broken. Can you look from the foot up to the hip for swelling, redness, or bruising? Forcing her to rest the leg for a few days in a crate with food and water would be a good idea. I have had them limp for 6 weeks, and get better, and had one limp for 18 months until she got worse and I put her down. They will run all over to be with their flock, so you could sit her covered cage near the hens outside for company. High roosts or ladders can cause leg problems. If it is steep up to their coop, you might try some varying heigh tree stumps to get up there. I would probably use a B Complex tablet crushed into her food or water daily. Hopefully, she will improve with rest, but sprains can take several weeks to heal.
     

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