hen keeps getting attacked

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by trunkman, Jan 24, 2010.

  1. trunkman

    trunkman Chillin' With My Peeps

    Dec 26, 2009
    Rock Hill SC
    One of my white rock hens has bloody raw spots on her back just under the end of her wings, I think the roo's are attacking her, I also think she's at the bottom of the pecking order. I never wanted roo's in the first place but thought they would protect the flock, I'm thinking of getting rid of the roo's altogether, is this a good idea? I don't want fertile eggs or chicks, so If I get rid of Roo's will the hens be ok?[​IMG]
     
  2. wildorchid053

    wildorchid053 Chillin' With My Peeps

    May 12, 2009
    syracuse area, ny
    yes they will be happy.. or you can do what i did.. make them little dresses for protection.
     
  3. trunkman

    trunkman Chillin' With My Peeps

    Dec 26, 2009
    Rock Hill SC
    thanks wildor
     
  4. ranchhand

    ranchhand Rest in Peace 1956-2011

    13,295
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    Aug 25, 2008
    SC
    Quote:The hens will do just fine without roos, but they won't have the flock protector. It sounds like the roos are breeding her more than the others. How many roos and how many hens do you have together? A ratio of 10 hens to one roo is the recommended minimum.

    Roosters will frequently pick a favorite hen for breeding, and she will lose the feathers on her back and sometimes the back of her head. Usually a chicken saddle will allow her feathers to grow back. Do a search top right for chicken saddles and you might be able to make or buy some.

    On the other hand, she may be getting pecked by other hens while on the roost at night. In that case, separate her until the feathers grow back, or apply some Blu-Kote, available at feed stores, until she heals.
    When she is healed, separate the most dominant hen for a few days- re-arranging the pecking order usually helps.

    Also, I have good luck with selective rehoming of roos on the local Craig's List.
     
  5. RedfogsFlock

    RedfogsFlock Chillin' With My Peeps

    616
    5
    143
    Jan 17, 2010
    Wittmann, AZ
    Quote:The hens will do just fine without roos, but they won't have the flock protector. It sounds like the roos are breeding her more than the others. How many roos and how many hens do you have together? A ratio of 10 hens to one roo is the recommended minimum.

    Roosters will frequently pick a favorite hen for breeding, and she will lose the feathers on her back and sometimes the back of her head. Usually a chicken saddle will allow her feathers to grow back. Do a search top right for chicken saddles and you might be able to make or buy some.

    On the other hand, she may be getting pecked by other hens while on the roost at night. In that case, separate her until the feathers grow back, or apply some Blu-Kote, available at feed stores, until she heals.
    When she is healed, separate the most dominant hen for a few days- re-arranging the pecking order usually helps.

    Also, I have good luck with selective rehoming of roos on the local Craig's List.

    That was what I was wondering,,,,,your roo to hen ratio? I've heard that you should have at minimum 10 hens for one roo. It does sound as if the other hens may be contributing some themselves. Did this ever happen before the roos came along?
     

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