Hen laying shell-less eggs. Can I help her?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by juliechick, Mar 4, 2009.

  1. juliechick

    juliechick Transplanted Hillbilly

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    I have a Silkie hen that is about 2 years old. She, as far as I can remember, has never stopped laying since she started. (Her name is Faithful.) Yesterday I noticed that she had layed a shell-less, bloody egg. Today she seems uncomfortable. She's puffed up and walking on her toes, kind of. I felt of her abdomen and it's not hard. She does seem to be straining sometimes, so I guess there's another egg in there. Is there anything I can do for her?
     
  2. RIVERA69R

    RIVERA69R Chillin' With My Peeps

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    And she has all the essentials layer feed, oyster shells, grit, water, etc? [​IMG]
     
  3. juliechick

    juliechick Transplanted Hillbilly

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    Yes, she does.

    I did a search and found some advice that had been posted before. I hope it will work. We're pretty attached to her.
     
    Last edited: Mar 4, 2009
  4. chickensioux

    chickensioux Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Read all you can about "internal laying". I had one do this with tragic results. Antibiotics ASAP from what I understand could have saved mine. Best of luck and keep us posted.
     
  5. MoodyChicken

    MoodyChicken Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Soft-shelled eggs are more difficult for a hen to lay. There's nothing for her to push on. She's probably egg bound with a softie. Try getting some olive oil into her vent and oviduct. Also, hold her in a bucket of warm water for a few minutes or hold her over steam (not too close, they have very sensitive skin) to relax the muscles.

    Coccidiosis is notorious for causing soft-shelled eggs and blood. You may want to treat her for that.
     

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