Hen Limping - Not eating or drinking

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Farmer Hensley, Oct 16, 2014.

  1. Farmer Hensley

    Farmer Hensley New Egg

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    Oct 15, 2014
    Southern California
    Hello fellow chicken loving friends! Although I have enjoyed this site for a couple of years now, I just now joined (the flock, so to speak). Unfortunately, I was mainly prompted due to a sad situation with my BR hen and not sure how I can help her.

    About 2 1/2 weeks ago at 3am in the morning my BR fell off of the roost (I am assuming) and started cackling similar to the "egg laying song", however, it was not from laying an egg. She was in the run limping very badly. Obviously, something traumatic happened and I am not sure what - but what I do know is that my daughter, who was pulling an all nigher for a school project, had her window open and heard the flapping of wings and then a "thud". We gently picked her up and put her in one of the nesting boxes. She seemed ok to sleep in there for the rest of the night.

    Next morning I saw her out in the run still limping very badly and her 4 sisters were giving her a hard time so, at the suggestion of several BYC members on related threads, I put her in a separate cage with food and water. I examined her and did not see any blood or limb dislocation so I figured that it was a bad sprain. I gave her treats of fruit and oatmeal which she was enjoying but I never witnessed her eating her regular food and water. For the next 2 weeks I have kept her in the cage, letting her out for small periods of time to peck around and be with her sisters (but separated by chicken wire so they won't peck her). But in the last 3-4 days she has not been eating any food - nothing seems to interest her. She appears to just want to peck around the yard and I am assuming that she gets a bug here and there but I cant imagine that she is being nourished properly. We did find out a "trick" to get her to drink water and that was to let some water "pool" in the grass/dirt and she would drink a couple of gulps from there (I find it bizarre that she will drink from the ground but not from her waterer). We also have discovered that she has a lump just underneath her wing (on her thigh, it looks like) about the size of an egg. I am hoping that this is just swelling from inflammation and not a serious dislocation but I find it hard t o believe that she would be still swelling up after having limited usage and caged (most of the time) for 2 1/2 weeks now.

    She appears to be making a slow recovery as far as the limping goes but now my biggest concern is that she doesn't seem to be eating at all now which obviously can't last forever.

    Wondering if anybody has any advice on where to go from here. I would be heartbroken to lose her and I don't want her to have a bad quality of life from a possible broken limb that heals incorrectly.

    A couple of other notes...she is currently molting (even before the accident) and is not laying as a result.
     
  2. seminolewind

    seminolewind Flock Mistress Premium Member

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    Sep 6, 2007
    spring hill, florida
    Hi, first I would give her anything she;ll eat. Mine seem to like wet mash. Another hen kept with her might encourage her appetite as she watches the other one eat.
     
  3. Farmer Hensley

    Farmer Hensley New Egg

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    Oct 15, 2014
    Southern California
    Thank you. Unfortunately, even my most friendly hen (outside of the one that is hurt) picks and pecks on her. The other hens just seem to have this keen sense that she is vulnerable and take advantage of it, I guess.

    I did get some meal worms and fed them to her this morning and she ate them like nobody's business. It seems that she is only interested in eating bugs right now. Also tried some bread and she ate a very tiny bit. I tried the wet mash and she pecked a couple of very small bites and then walked away. She does seem to get around a little better each day, but I just wish she would eat and drink like normal.
     

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