Hen lost weight and now walking around in circles?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by eksterhuis, Jan 27, 2012.

  1. eksterhuis

    eksterhuis Chillin' With My Peeps

    152
    0
    89
    Jan 7, 2012
    I have a 2 year old Wyandotte hen (who I have only owned about 3 weeks). She was very light weight when I got her compared to the other 4 but I have been trying to feed them all up during moulting time. She has always been more withdrawn than the other chickens and now she is walking around in circles. When she stands still her head sort of follows round to the side and she starts slowly walking in anticlockwise circles like she can't help it. What could it be? I am going to separate her now and see what she does...
     
  2. eksterhuis

    eksterhuis Chillin' With My Peeps

    152
    0
    89
    Jan 7, 2012
    I have isolated her and given her some ham scraps and other food but she is ignoring it. Her eyes are half closed she seems very weak and her head keeps twisting round. She has now sat down and looks like she is sleeping. I am wondering if she is dying? I had to cull my first hen this morning who was unable to stand and kept falling over like she was drunk and partly paralyzed. I hope I don't have something going round... and if I do what could it be?
     
  3. WooingWyandotte

    WooingWyandotte Overrun With Chickens

    8,965
    50
    276
    Apr 25, 2011
    Nor cal
    It sounds like that hen you culled is the key. Maybe you could dissect her and search for any oddities; so...Unable to stand, partially paralyzed..sounds like what this Wyandotte is doing. I have no answer for what it might be, but I'll research it. Hold on.
     
  4. eksterhuis

    eksterhuis Chillin' With My Peeps

    152
    0
    89
    Jan 7, 2012
    Thanks, the only thing is the Wyandotte has been a bit off for ages but the Faverolles was completely happy and healthy today and was very alert just unable to walk... The Wyandotte seems very different, sleepy and dizzy but her wings and legs are fine... The Fav seemed to be fine in the head but body wonky, like opposites!

     
  5. WooingWyandotte

    WooingWyandotte Overrun With Chickens

    8,965
    50
    276
    Apr 25, 2011
    Nor cal
    Here I found this..

    Newcastle Disease

    Synonyms: pneumoencephalitis
    The highly contagious and lethal form of Newcastle disease is known as viscerotropic (attacks the internal organs) velogenic Newcastle disease, VVND, exotic Newcastle disease, or Asiatic Newcastle disease. VVND is not present in the United States poultry industry at this time.
    Species affected: Newcastle disease affects all birds of all ages. Humans and other mammals are also susceptible to Newcastle. In such species, it causes a mild conjunctivitis.
    Clinical signs: There are three forms of Newcastle disease -- mildly pathogenic (lentogenic), moderately pathogenic (mesogenic) and highly pathogenic (velogenic). Newcastle disease is characterized by a sudden onset of clinical signs which include hoarse chirps (in chicks), watery discharge from nostrils, labored breathing (gasping), facial swelling, paralysis, trembling, and twisting of the neck (sign of central nervous system involvement). Mortality ranges from 10 to 80 percent depending on the pathogenicity. In adult laying birds, symptoms can include decreased feed and water consumption and a dramatic drop in egg production (see Table 1 ).
    Transmission: The Newcastle virus can be transmitted short distances by the airborne route or introduced on contaminated shoes, caretakers, feed deliverers, visitors, tires, dirty equipment, feed sacks, crates, and wild birds. Newcastle virus can be passed in the egg, but Newcastle-infected embryos die before hatching. In live birds, the virus is shed in body fluids, secretions, excreta, and breath.
    Treatment: There is no specific treatment for Newcastle disease. Antibiotics can be given for 3-5 days to prevent secondary bacterial infections (particularly E. coli ). For chicks, increasing the brooding temperature 5°F may help reduce losses.

    Prevention: Prevention programs should include vaccination (see publication PS-36, Vaccination of Small Poultry Flocks), good sanitation, and implementation of a comprehensive biosecurity program.Quote:
     
  6. eksterhuis

    eksterhuis Chillin' With My Peeps

    152
    0
    89
    Jan 7, 2012
    I am in New Zealand and just checked that there has been no cases of Newcastle disease in NZ... So it's not that! Hurm...
     
  7. WooingWyandotte

    WooingWyandotte Overrun With Chickens

    8,965
    50
    276
    Apr 25, 2011
    Nor cal
    "Paralysis can be the result of nutritional deficits (they should be on high quality, age-appropriate pelleted or crumble diet), viral or bacterial infection, trauma, anemia, and so forth. Tetracycline is at best worthless, but may actually be quite dangerous. It binds calcium (which may be her problem anyway) and can lower immune response. Discontinue immediately.

    You can examine her thoroughly again, including opening the mouth and having a good look in there for mucus, redness, masses or anything else unusual. You can take her temperature gently with a rectal thermometer. Anything above 105F/40C is significant. Palpate the tummy for pain, fluid, lumps or anything else. Check all her joints for swelling, pain, and mobility."

    Any help there?
     
  8. eksterhuis

    eksterhuis Chillin' With My Peeps

    152
    0
    89
    Jan 7, 2012
    No I can't see anything! I will see how she goes over the day. Just annoying that it is Saturday and everything will be closed tomorrow if I decide she needs medication! It could be Coccidiosis or Merek's but it doesn't look like Merek's... The one that died this morning did not look like she had Merek's paralasis (I have watched a few videos on good olde YouTube of it). I think that the two chickens have unrelated issues... It could be that this chicken is just older than I thought and is just sick (if that makes sense)... Will watch her and I am waiting for the guy who sold me her to phone back and see he has been having any issues. I just worry because I have 19 chicks less than 4 days old around the place and don't want them picking anything up!
     
  9. eksterhuis

    eksterhuis Chillin' With My Peeps

    152
    0
    89
    Jan 7, 2012
    After speaking to a couple of poultry breeders I know and discussion with my boyfriend he culled her (as I had already one one today it seemed fair). It was too much of a risk if she did have a contagious infection (even if she did it is probably too late but it's better late than never). She was not eating and unable to move around (apart from in circles). With 19 chicks born this week on the property and more on the way next week I don't want infections going round! It was very sad as apart from looking sleepy, wobbling her head and being super light she seemed OK. I phoned the man I bought her off and he has had no problems and is going to replace her with another hen (though he does not have any more Wyandottes). It was very kind of him. I will wait a week or so to make sure none of the other hens get ill first! On top of all this my cat had an absess and had a drain put in at the vets this morning. It is a sad day in our house for pet ownership!
     
  10. WooingWyandotte

    WooingWyandotte Overrun With Chickens

    8,965
    50
    276
    Apr 25, 2011
    Nor cal
    Yes, that's very understandable. I wouldn't want anything getting to my other birds either. [​IMG] Killing a chicken is always kinda sad, but remember it was for the best.
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by