Hen Only makes male chicks

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by TinaHail, Feb 11, 2017.

  1. TinaHail

    TinaHail In the Brooder

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    My female hen had about 10 baby chickens, ALL MALES? (Only one, super small female) What happened? Also, any ways to make the crowing minimal?
     
    Last edited: Feb 11, 2017

  2. centrarchid

    centrarchid Free Ranging

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    You can have a hen produce only males in a brood of 10 chicks. If she repeats then real.
     
  3. TheKindaFarmGal

    TheKindaFarmGal Free Ranging

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    There was a female. It's just a bad ratio.
     
  4. rebrascora

    rebrascora Crowing

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    Eating the excess ones usually reduces the crowing quite dramatically[​IMG]
     

  5. TinaHail

    TinaHail In the Brooder

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    Okay. Thanks for letting me know. I was really freaking out
     
  6. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler! Premium Member

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    Hahaha!! It does indeed!
     
  7. Happy Chooks

    Happy Chooks Moderator Staff Member

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    It might not be the hen. How were these eggs incubated? I've had temperature spikes during incubation that killed off the female eggs and only the males by majority survived. If you incubated them yourself, then it may be temperature related. If hens incubated them, it's likely the hen.
     

  8. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler! Premium Member

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    I thought it was males that the high temps killed.......I might have it reversed, but good point.
     
  9. Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner Free Ranging

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    Did one hen lay all the eggs or were they a mix from different hens? Did a hen incubate them or were they in an incubator? Some unanswered questions here.

    I’ve read that males can survive high incubating heat better than pullets. I have not read that pullets can survive low incubating heat better than males. Of course I read a lot, some of it fiction. I have not seen any scientific evidence one way or another.

    Odds are odds. I’m not going through the math but the odds of getting 9 males and 1 female out of ten chicks is probably less than 1 in 1000. It may not happen often but 1 in 1000 odds do happen.

    My incubator runs just a tad warm, about 0.1 to 0.2 degrees F high. Sometimes the chicks hatch a bit early, some pretty much on time. Two years ago I had a hatch where 14 were pullets and 7 were cockerels. Last year I had one hatch with 14 pullets and 5 cockerels. Both hatches were about a day early. I’ve also had hatches with similar numbers but more males than females. I’ve had hatches under broody hens where the sex ratio were just as skewed. I agree that two hatches is not a statistically valid number, you’d have to have a lot more for averages to start meaning much. I don’t know how high the temperature would have to be for this theory to come into play. Personally I put zero faith in the temperature having anything to do with which sex survives to hatch, but I’ve been wrong before.
     

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