1. If this is your first time on BYC, we suggest you start with one of these three options:
    Raising Chickens Chicken Coops Join BYC
    If you're already a member of our community, click here to login & click here to learn what's new!

Hen ripped her comb yesterday. Is dubbing the best option?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Geant, Nov 10, 2010.

  1. Geant

    Geant New Egg

    5
    0
    7
    Nov 10, 2010
    East Tennessee
    One of my chickens was squawking at something yesterday so I went out there to to check on them and everything was fine. I sat down with them and took my jacket off, this spooked them for some reason. They flew through the netting/gate and Shirley ripped part of her comb off. The bleeding stopped and we put some triple antibiotic gel on the wound, a section about the size if my smallest fingernail is gone though. I don't like the idea of cutting her comb off, but if that's what it takes I'll do it (Or more likely get a vet to help me). She doesn't appear to be in any pain or discomfort, she's a bit skittish today though. Normally if I sit down with them she'd jump on my shoulder and sit down, but today she just walked over to me, pecked at my jeans and went on her way. She's still eating and drinking like she would normally. (I was told not to clean the dried blood off her comb)

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  2. Judy

    Judy Moderator Staff Member

    34,028
    450
    448
    Feb 5, 2009
    South Georgia
    I don't think there's really any need to dub for a wound that size.

    You could have cleaned the dried blood off. I probably wouldn't at this stage, though. I'd leave it alone, maybe add some more Neospirin tonight or tomorrow. Chickens heal very well.

    Good luck.
     
  3. ChickieBerryFarm

    ChickieBerryFarm Out Of The Brooder

    28
    0
    22
    Nov 9, 2010
    Southern Indiana
    Do you have access to a Rural King? If you can find it, get you some Bag Balm. It works really well. It's an antiseptic ointment that is used in farming...no script required. My neighbor had a coon get into her coop and damage some of the combs on her hens. She used the bag balm and added blue food coloring to it to keep the others from picking on it...you don't want that! The comb seemed to mend itself...it kind of regenerated the tissue. You could see where the damage was, but it healed over nicely.

    She probably will be skiddish for a couple of days...might even stop laying for a few. Chickens don't handle trauma very well and it'll take her a couple of days to get back to norm. Just make sure that the others done start picking.

    Good luck!
     
  4. Geant

    Geant New Egg

    5
    0
    7
    Nov 10, 2010
    East Tennessee
    Thanks for the responses! So I just need to keep an eye on it? Is there a chance that the rear of the comb will rot? I apologize for the questions but it absolutely kills me that one of my girls got hurt. I was considering getting a few more hens, but I should put a hold on that right?
     
  5. NYREDS

    NYREDS Overrun With Chickens

    5,644
    367
    303
    Jan 14, 2008
    You don't need to do anything, she'll be fine. I raise games & dub them regularly. Sometimes use a little Blood Stop Powder right after dubbing but never any other medication. I've dubbed hundreds & have never had one get infected.
    I don't see why this would stop you from getting more hens-especially if you'd like to come buy some from me.
     
  6. Geant

    Geant New Egg

    5
    0
    7
    Nov 10, 2010
    East Tennessee
    She's the queen of the coop and with her comb looking that way I thought that new chickens might peck at her for it. Thank you all so much for the help!
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by