Hen saver is bad!

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by 6Chickens&counting, Jun 15, 2011.

  1. 6Chickens&counting

    6Chickens&counting Chillin' With My Peeps

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    If you don't know what it is then click the website below-

    http://www.hensaver.com

    The reason it is bad is chicken have an oil gland on their back by their tail... it's purpose is chicken rub oil onto their feathers, you may think they are just cleaning their feathers but no they are spreading oil on their feathers! That hen saver blocks the oil gland!!! [​IMG]
     
  2. greenfamilyfarms

    greenfamilyfarms Big Pippin'

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    I have made some of these myself and they don't block the oil glad. They work great to protect the hen from feather loss and possible injury from the rooster, if you ask me.
     
  3. gryeyes

    gryeyes Covered in Pet Hair & Feathers

    Some of my hens have worn hen "aprons" and a hen-saver, and the back section is NOT snapped down or otherwise kept from being moved by the hen's beak to access the oil gland. My girls preen themselves just fine.
     
  4. BooBear

    BooBear Chicken Cuddler

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    It shouldn't if it is cut to the right size.
    Chicken saddles can be made per measurements of the chicken. There are different folks that make them to sell. Also, you can find patterns to make yourself.

    They are designed to protect raw, barebacks to allow feathers to grow back in and are awesome. I used one for Spot when he was stripped of his back feathers by his broodmates.
     
  5. 6Chickens&counting

    6Chickens&counting Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Ohh I just saw the back was not strapped down thats so much better! [​IMG]
     
  6. ranchhand

    ranchhand Rest in Peace 1956-2011

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    Apron, saddle, hen saver - whatever you want to call it- does not impair access to the hen's parts by the hen herself.

    I am not aware of an oil gland in chickens, only in waterfowl. Anybody have specific info? I do know that if they stand out in the rain, they get soaked.
     
  7. zazouse

    zazouse Overrun With Chickens

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    Chickens do have oil glands it is at the base of their tail on top, i think i have a photo of a molting hen that show the gland ,i will see if i can find it.
     
    Last edited: Jun 15, 2011
  8. BooBear

    BooBear Chicken Cuddler

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    It kinda looks like a flesh colored mole at the tail area.
     
  9. zazouse

    zazouse Overrun With Chickens

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    Here is a tibit of info on preening [​IMG]

    Preening waterproofs and conditions feathers
    Most birds have a preen gland, or uropygial gland, at the base of the tail. The gland produces uropygial oil, a waxy substance used to waterproof and condition feathers. Rubbing the preen gland with the beak, a bird picks up the oil and then distributes it onto feathers by rubbing the beak over the feathers. It’s thought that the oil from the preen gland also helps to make the feathers supple and strong and prevents them from drying out.

    Some species of birds, such as bustards, do not have uropygial glands—these are usually birds that live in dry habitats where protection from getting wet is not an issue. Other birds, particularly diving birds, have large uropygial glands. American Dippers, for example, have uropygial glands ten times the average size of those of birds in their Order. Preening and distributing the oil over feathers is important for birds that spend a lot of time in the water.

    Some birds, particularly herons, have powder-down feathers. Powder-down feathers are distributed all over the body in some birds, while in others they occur in patches. These feathers break down into a powdery substance when a bird preens and the powder is distributed over the rest of the feathers by beak and claw in a similar fashion to uropygial oil. Powder-down provides some water resistance.

    Birds often like to take dust baths before preening, coating their feathers with dust and sometimes even rolling in dust. It’s thought that dust helps to dry wet feathers, soaks up extra uropygial oil, and inhibits parasites.



    Read more at Suite101: Why Do Birds Preen?: Preening With Beaks and Claws is Important for Feathers and Skin | Suite101.com http://www.suite101.com/content/why-do-birds-preen-a18521#ixzz1PNppETV7
     

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