Hen Standing on one leg

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by kindir, Nov 29, 2009.

  1. kindir

    kindir Songster

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    Aug 27, 2009
    Connecticut
    I have a hen who was limping yesterday and is now hopping on one leg. She's eating fine, but looks a little puffed up and is not happy. I checked her feet and there doesn't appear to be anything wrong with them. I have noticed that she has a slight nasal discharge today. Any thoughts on what this may be? She's one of my better layers and I'd like to do whatever I can for her!!!

    If I could figure out how to post photos I'd post one of her. It's not Marek's I don't think because she's just picking it up, it isn't placed awkwardly or anything. And she can move it. Any help would be greatly appreciated!!!
     

  2. Might have started as a simple trauma, but the nasal component says more is going on.

    Do you have access to a vet?

    You can certainly offer her vitamins in her water because Vitamin D in particular is linked to calcium production and lack of it can cause limping. Vitamins B and E are also involved in bone health. If you do, use either poultry vitamins or baby vitamins without added iron.

    You should segregate her and keep her in a warm draft-free room, perhaps in a dog cage, deep bedded and with a perch on the floor such as a piece of 4x4. Feed and water by hand if necessary, check crop and vent. There are viruses in which limping is a component, and you should check on Marek's and coccidiosis as a precaution.

    Another possibility is that it is a trauma, she is experiencing pain for the first time, and that she has not been able to compete for food or gain access to food/water and is getting cold and hungry.

    Can you describe her droppings?
     
    Last edited: Nov 29, 2009
  3. kindir

    kindir Songster

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    Aug 27, 2009
    Connecticut
    Thank you so much for your reply! Unfortunately I don't know of ANY vets in this area that take chickens - I've tried. Not even Tufts which has a large and small animal hospital will take chickens - it's really maddening. [​IMG]

    Anyway, I'll move her to the dog crate which is what I generally use for isolating sick chickens. I have not been feeding any calcium since nobody seems to have needed it - the eggs have all been fine - perhaps I need to start feeding it again? I was under the impression that if you are feeding layer crumbles it has all the necessary nutrients in it?

    How much of the vitamins do I put in ther water? I have a small waterer that has large mason jar attached that I use for the isolation area.

    i did feed her some freeze dried mealworms, since if my chickens don't take that they are REALLY sick. She gobbled it up with gusto, so she certainly has an appetite. I haven't seen her droppings but once I put her in the crate I'll be able to isolate which are hers and report back.

    Sorry for so many questions, but I'm a newbie to this and while I've been doing a lot of research, I have a LOT to learn!!! It's all rather easy when they are doing well, but when they get sick it's more traumatic than I'd anticipated!
     

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