hen with breathing problems died

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by colleenmarie, Jan 8, 2009.

  1. colleenmarie

    colleenmarie New Egg

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    Jan 8, 2009
    One of my 3 year old hens, Sweet Annie, had trouble breathing (mouth open, eyes closing.) I went to get her a carrier to seperate her from the flock, all pet chickens. I got back to the pen, she seemed better. I scooted her into the pen, so I could pick her up. she started gasping for breath and violently throwing herself against the pen walls. she died a few minutes later why I stood helplessly watching her. please help. I have no idea what happened., she seemed very healthy till this happened. Now, and I might just be paranoid, but one of my beloved roosters seems to be breathing heavy. I'm very concerned. i don't know what happened to my hen, Sweet Annie, and am wondering if our rooster, Richard, could have the same problem. please ask any relevant questions. thank you!
    Colleen
     
  2. Robin'sBrood

    Robin'sBrood Flock Mistress

    May 8, 2008
    North Carolina
    I don't know what happened to Sweet Annie (what a sweet name) but I just wanted to give you a cyber [​IMG] and say I'm very sorry.
     
  3. Robin'sBrood

    Robin'sBrood Flock Mistress

    May 8, 2008
    North Carolina
    Oh, and [​IMG]
     
  4. birdlover

    birdlover Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jan 11, 2007
    Northern Va.
    I am so sorry for your precious Sweet Annie. If you still have her body, I would take her for a necropsy and see what she died of. That way, if she has something contagious, you'll know what you're dealing with. I know you can get a necropsy done at a vet who handles birds, or the state vet or some universities that have agricultural colleges. If you decide to do this, put her in the freezer or, if it's freezing outside, you can leave her out. Again, I am so sorry. I know how devastated you must be and, also, I can relate to the paranoia. I hope your rooster is okay. [​IMG]
     
  5. #1California Chick

    #1California Chick Chillin' With My Peeps

    Dec 5, 2008
    SF Bay Area
    [​IMG] Welcome to BYC [​IMG]

    I am SSOOO sorry that your first post has to be for an emergency!!

    I would follow the post above and see if you find out what happened to your hen.

    [​IMG]

    Cindy
     
  6. colleenmarie

    colleenmarie New Egg

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    Jan 8, 2009
    What a wonderful website i have found. thank you all for your words of comfort. It's always nice to have people around who love their chickens lilke I love mine.

    My roo was fine this morning, thank goodness. I will be watching the whole flock very carefully for any signs of illness. I've had my chickens for four years, and I've never had anything like this happen before, so it's very scary.

    We have already burined Annie, but I am trying to locate a vet in are area that handles birds incase we have a emergency.

    Does anyone thing I should put some terramycin in their water or, should I just watch them closely for signs of illness and take action if something happens ?

    Thanks you all again for your kind words, and support.

    colleen marie
     
  7. birdlover

    birdlover Chillin' With My Peeps

    1,770
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    Jan 11, 2007
    Northern Va.
    And we're glad you found US!! [​IMG] I wouldn't give antibiotics unless you see signs of illness. It's not recommended. But you could put apple cider vinegar (organic with the "mother") and garlic in their water. Lots of chicken folk do that to help them stay healthy. It's good you're looking for a vet for in case of any future emergency. Some rural places don't really have vets available for treating chickens, unfortunately. In my area, I have TWO top notch avian vets (but very expensive, too!). Where do you live?
     
  8. CarriBrown

    CarriBrown Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

    I'm sorry to hear about your girl. [​IMG] Sometimes, and the longtime chicken keepers on this board will tell you also, they just die and you never do figure out why. If you have another bird die, I strongly suggest a necropsy. For now, keep an eye on your flock and note any strange occurrences. The problem with chickens is they are very good at hiding illnesses until it's too late, so really get to know how your birds act so you're able to spot a problem right away.
    Look for signs such as droopy tails, crackling sounds while breathing, inactivity (or if the bird is less active than normal), runny or abnormal poop (especially if there is blood in it), etc.
     

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