Hen with Curled Feet

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by HoosierSilkie, Apr 22, 2017.

  1. HoosierSilkie

    HoosierSilkie Out Of The Brooder

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    Jan 18, 2017
    Southern Indiana
    Hi all, I have a 3 month old bantam hen that we noticed today walking with her feet curled under. One side is worse than the other, but she is basically walking (stumbling) around with her toes curled completely under her feet. None of the others are doing this. She's active and eating well. I have her in a wire crate so the others can't get to her. I'm afraid they'll notice a weakness and start picking at her. Any ideas what could cause this in an otherwise healthy bird? Anything I can do to help her?
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  2. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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    Apr 3, 2011
    southern Ohio
    That could be riboflavin (vitamin B2) deficiency, so I would give it a small amount of chopped beef liver, or put some poultry vitamins in the water very soon. The soon this is treated the better the chances of recovery.
     
    Last edited: Apr 22, 2017
  3. HoosierSilkie

    HoosierSilkie Out Of The Brooder

    48
    5
    24
    Jan 18, 2017
    Southern Indiana
    I have poly vi sol; I'll put it in her water now! Is it unusual for only one to be affected? The others are all fine.
     
  4. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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    Apr 3, 2011
    southern Ohio
    I would just give her 3 drops orally each day, instead of putting it in water. It is more economical that way, and the right dose is given. Chick vitamins such as Rooster Booster Vitamins With Lactobacillus is a good one for the water. Durvet sells some as well. The only one I know of not to use is NutriDrench which does not contain riboflavin. It is hard to say why one chick is affected. It could be related to a deficiency in the parent stock, especially when it happens early after hatch, or it can be from feed that may have not been fresh dated or sat on the shelf too long.
    Curled under toes and stumbling or imbalance can sometimes be a sign of Mareks disease. Riboflavin deficiency normally shows some improvement within a week or so after treatment is started. I am not a vet, nor have I treated this, but have seen a lot of chickens improve with riboflavin here on this forum. Hopefully, your pullet will too.
     

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