Hen with raw spot on her abdomen

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Pattid, Dec 15, 2014.

  1. Pattid

    Pattid Out Of The Brooder

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    Sep 10, 2013
    I have a hen who is about 19 months old who has a raw-looking spot on her abdomen, just below her vent. Her vent looks normal and she is behaving normally, eating, pooing, scratching, competing for treats. I had noticed last week that she seemed to be missing some feathers in that area and today noticed a small area (less than a dime size) that looks raw in the midst of that area. Any suggestions what might be going on and what if anything I should do?
     
  2. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive True BYC Addict

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    A picture may help. It could be feather-picking by some of the other chickens. I would look them over very closely with a magnifying glass for signs of lice and mites, or their eggs. lice and mites will be killed by permethrin or Sevin dust. Chickens who pick feathers may need more room, more protein in the diet, or just need to get outside to ease boredom.
     
  3. Michael Apple

    Michael Apple Overrun With Chickens

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    What breed of hen is it? Heavier breeds can develop breast sores on the keel (breast) bone when resting on roosts of improper size and shape. What are you using for roosts, and how high are they off the floor?
     
  4. Pattid

    Pattid Out Of The Brooder

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    Eggcessive, I dusted for mites in October (we had another hen die-unknown causes-and saw mites on her when we found her), and haven't seen any sign since. I suspect it might be boredom. The pen isn't excessively large and though they were content in it last winter, our weather has been unusually mild. They typically are out to roam more when it's like this, but the whole family has had a lot going on and we haven't been letting them out as much as usual. I have a half day off tomorrow and had hoped to let them out more. We are on a small suburban lot and they have to be watched when out so they don't go dig up the neighbor's yard! This girl tends to be the worst offender. She is something smallish and blonde, but I'm not sure her breed. She came from a pen of chicks at Tractor Supply and the sign listed several breed that they could be. She's usually more the aggressor rather than the picked-on. Our coop has two rows of nesting boxes and the roosting bar is in front of the upper row at its floor level. They seem to not spend a lot of time sitting on it, but jump to it and then to the nesting boxes. Should I be treating the sore spot with any ointment?
     
  5. Pattid

    Pattid Out Of The Brooder

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    I'll take a better look tomorrow. By the time I could give this much attention, it was dark out. I can try and get a picture too.
     
  6. Pattid

    Pattid Out Of The Brooder

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    [​IMG]
    Here she is in action. You can barely see the area that is bald. Today the raw spot has scabbed over. She and the others had a nice wander around our yard!
     
  7. Pattid

    Pattid Out Of The Brooder

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    No sign of mites or other bugs. There are more feathers missing further forward, but not so far forward as her keel, only to between her legs. Maybe it's how she's resting? I've noticed that our girls like to sleep in the nesting boxes rather than on their perch, one per box unless it's very cold out and then they might group up. She got a good wander around the yard today with lots of earthworms and other treats. I've also hung a cabbage in the pen for them to pick at.
     
    Last edited: Dec 16, 2014
  8. Michael Apple

    Michael Apple Overrun With Chickens

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    I have had a few hens, with a tendency towards broodiness, pluck some feathers from their chest and add it to the nest.
     

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