Hennies In My Heart: Adventures In Chicken Math, Heritage/Rare Breeds Advocacy and Life In General!

Discussion in 'Pictures & Stories of My Chickens' started by HenniesInMyHeart, May 10, 2018.

  1. HenniesInMyHeart

    HenniesInMyHeart Songster

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    Jubilee Avie 2.png
    Well, here it is...I've finally done it! I've made a dedicated, open-ended topic which will become a journal of my adventures in Chook Land! I hope it proves interesting, and maybe even useful, but above all I hope to make new friends and revel in our shared passion for "feather puppies," as my very maternal and matriarchal pug has deemed them!

    Where to begin? MY FAVORITE BREEDS post seems fitting, yes?
    "I strongly support conservation of heritage and ultra-rare/endangered breeds! Because of this, I have focused my attention on:
    1. ENGLISH JUBILEE ORPINGTONS. These beautiful birds are exquisitely patterned! They were bred for Queen Victoria's Diamond Jubilee by William Cook, who developed the original Orpington. They became such a strong symbol of British pride that during WWII, Hitler ordered them all to be killed. They nearly went extinct after the War. Greenfire Farms, known for conserving rare poultry species and bringing ultra-rare birds to the U.S., were the first to import these birds. Like all English Orpingtons, they are unparalleled in their gentle personalities, regal carriage and loving nature, as well as being good dual-purpose production birds. They do well in cold weather, so they do well here in Colorado! Their beauty and gentle affectionate nature immediately stole my heart.
    Orpingtons are the ultimate love bugs! :love

    2. CORONATION SUSSEX. Sussex hens are huge, excellent pets and so friendly! They have a very aristocratic gait which matches their heritage. They were bred in England for the coronation of King George. These birds are so soft and fluffy, they have down like a goose and are therefore very cold-hearty birds, which is ideal for Colorado's cold season climate. Sussex are chatty but not loud. They are inquisitive and intelligent and an all-around incredible bird! Sussex are considered to be excellent meat birds, and they are good layers, too.
    They found a place in my heart for their personalities and beauty. I just adore them! This is another ultra-rare chicken, and I believe this was one of the first breeds imported by Greenfire Farms. At that time, there were less than 50 birds remaining in the UK. Greenfire has saved so many critically-endangered heritage breeds, and they continue to do so to this day.

    Number 3 is a tie for me; either Blue-Laced Red Wyandottes or LF Cochins. The latter are responsible for igniting interest in personal flock-keeping for the joy of it; for valuing chickens as pets or show birds above their utility as livestock. Cochins aren't great layers but they are such sweet and quiet and gentle birds. Who can resist these fluffy balls of cuteness?
    Wyandottes are near and dear to my heart because I've owned several as pets over the years, and BLRW phenotype is gorgeous."


    Since writing the above, Chicken Math has struck again and now I have SILKIES IN MY HEART, TOO! :love
    Currently, I have 6 Jubilee eggs in lockdown; seeing pips and hearing peeps! I also have 15 BLRW's resting to go into the bator in the morning, and I have black bearded silkie eggs on the way! To be ordered: blue cochins; paint silkies!

    Yep, chicken math! See what I mean? :gig

    ~*Love, Light and Hennie Hugs!*~
     
  2. HenniesInMyHeart

    HenniesInMyHeart Songster

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    AAAAAAaaaaaaaand...this thread was an epic fail, huh? :oops:
    So, an update:
    Of those 6 "jubilee orpingtons" that were in lockdown, 3 survived...and when they hatched, something about the chicks' coloring wasn't right. One of them developed the rose comb for which wyandottes are known! The other two look like JO's but I am unsure what their genetics truly are. 'Tis the risk of buying eggs from someone else's birds!
    None of those poor little black bearded silkies or BLRW's survived. I have lost so many chicks in lockdown and haven't known why, and I was devastated so much that I nearly gave up on my passion for hatching chicks. Fortunately, I've since learned that high altitude affects hatchability. I had no idea and hadn't even thought of it before stumbling on this info while researching causes for deaths in lockdown. Now I know, and will be supplementing oxygen at lockdown.

    So, here we are to today: 6.14.18.
    I've just gone through my first batch of silkie eggs and my black cochins, and I've got 2 definitely alive cochins ( plus 3 maybe's) and 4-5 definitely alive silkies (plus 1 or 2 maybe's).
    Right now, I am concerned because the embryos, although well-vascularized, look stuck to the top/side? I am not sure what to do about that. I am considering pulling them from the Brinsea Octagon and putting them in a manual bator. I just don't know! I hate this part, where you're unsure what to do. I will try to get some pics next candling.
    I've still got 24 BLRW eggs (set 6.10) and another dozen silkie eggs (set 6.13), so please pray for my babies!
     
    drumstick diva and bantamsrmyfav like this.
  3. bantamsrmyfav

    bantamsrmyfav Free Ranging

    I love your post! Prayers for your eggs!
     
  4. HenniesInMyHeart

    HenniesInMyHeart Songster

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    Aww thank you so much! :hugs
     
    drumstick diva and bantamsrmyfav like this.
  5. drumstick diva

    drumstick diva Still crazy after all these years.

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    Out to pasture
    sending great hatching vibes your way :jumpy:jumpy:jumpy:jumpy:jumpy:jumpy:jumpy- hope it helps
     
  6. HenniesInMyHeart

    HenniesInMyHeart Songster

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    Thank you so much! :hugs
     

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