hens are dieing??? help

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by zhairdzinr, Mar 4, 2013.

  1. zhairdzinr

    zhairdzinr New Egg

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    Hens are mixed layers, RIR ect. 15 hens and two roosters 1 rir and 1 grey. About 1 1/2 years old. three weeks ago switched feed to natural Kelly's for layers. There has been evidence of a rat? in the hen house.
    Two days ago in the am I found one hen in the hen house dead. no signs of injury or illness. Today found 4 dead? again no signs of illness or injury. Wierd they molted in the winter and are now getting nice and full and pretty.
    The feed switch started three weeks ago and the beging they layed 22 eggs in one day and twice the normal size. Sounded good so we switched out to full Kelly's starting two weeks ago. This am the flock was not excited to eat they did but not excited like normal. (Might be upset of so many friends dieing)? I really am upset and want to fix this fast.
    What should I do? I am first time flock owner and am sickened that i am making mistakes and the birds are paying for it somehow??
     
  2. jdywntr

    jdywntr Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I'm not familiar with the feed. You are sure its okay for chickens? Any pesticide sprayed around the coop? Rat poison or poisoned rats?
     
  3. yolkoroo

    yolkoroo Out Of The Brooder

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    One of two things based on what you have shared: 1) moldy food - how does the new food smell? could it have gotten wet or moist somehow? There is a conditions called Aspergillosis from chickens eating moldy food- symptoms Loss of appetite, more thirsty and Treatment: get rid of the food IMMEDIATELY, clean feeders, be sure that coop is dry and bedding dry and clean, and add diatomaceous earth on coop floor to keep dry...I think food immediately.

    Or, if a rat is in the coop, it could be an infection transferred by rat- I don't know about medication, but cleaning coop thouroughly and replacing bedding with dry/clean bedding, and add diatomaceous earth on coop floor to keep dry.

    Definitely give electrolytes in water immediately- that can't hurt.
     
  4. Michael Apple

    Michael Apple Overrun With Chickens

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    Rats, wild birds, and other rodents are spreaders of Cholera which is more common than I think most people realize. Rapid death, loss of weight, white to green diarrhea are common symptoms. Flock treatment is 1 tsp. of Sulfadimethoxine per gallon of water for 3 days, then change to 1 tsp. of tetracycline powder in a gallon of water for seven days. Follow up with vitamins-probiotics in the water for 3 days.
    If a bird is sick and not drinking, you'll need to treat individually it is preferred to use LA-200 @ 1cc injection in the breast muscle for 3-5 days. If it is a really resistant strain of Cholera treatments have been successful with .5cc of Gentamicin injected into the breast muscle for 3-5 days.

    Salmonella has similar symptoms but requires different treatment.
     
    Last edited: Mar 4, 2013
  5. yolkoroo

    yolkoroo Out Of The Brooder

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    If food doesn't smell bad at all I would go with the antibiotic treatment as suggested above. If you have any doubts about the food, I would remove the food as well. Check the directions on the antibiotics you get concerning how long to wait before collecting eggs again for consumption. Best wishes on the health of your flock.
     
  6. Michael Apple

    Michael Apple Overrun With Chickens

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    I realize some folks are unfamiliar with injections, and may be a bit nervous if they've never done it. Breast muscle injections are the quickest way to get antibiotics into a bird's system. The crop is not the breast. The breast is below the crop, and if you run your finger along the breast bone, on either side is the muscle mass.

    Taking a 25 gauge needle ( I use half inch long ones) on a syringe, swab the needle with rubbing alcohol and the pulling back the syringe to get air in it. Stick the needle in the rubber top of the bottle while it is standing up and push the air into the bottle. Turn the bottle upside down and draw the antibiotic solution past your desired amount, then push the syringe forward to the desired amount to eliminate any air bubbles in the syringe.

    You may want assistance, the first time you inject a bird. Pick the bird up and gently rest the bird on it's back while cradled in one arm. Swab the area of injection with a cotton ball dabbed in alcohol. Take about a 30 degree approach to the breast area injection, do not go straight in. Stick the needle gently but quickly about a 1/4 inch in and inject. Switch sides of the breast between injections to avoid irritation and soreness. It becomes second nature after doing it enough times.
     
  7. spies04

    spies04 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Hi - you should reach out to your feed supplier and the feed company's telephone number on the bag. They would know if there are reports of any other issues like you are describing or can track you as the first instance. It may start them to do testing on the feed itself and report back to you any findings. But I agree - if you are not sure if it is the feed or not, stop feeding it. But do not dump it completely in case the feed company requests some samples to test. They may also ask you for the lot number that is printed on the bag - all feed companies must be able trace products flowing out of their system.

    Good Luck!! I am also very sorry for the birds that you have lost.
     
  8. zhairdzinr

    zhairdzinr New Egg

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    Thank you everyone. Took one of the live chickens to a vet that specializes in birds. Insisted I take to California State lab and have them do testing. had to give up one so they could do an autopsy. Took sample of feed as well. I saved the bag the feed came in and can call today. vet was not thinking this chicken would live. I did clean coop and separated one more from flock. vet also suggested seperating at least one of the roosters from flock to make sure they do not take advantage of the hens while not feeling well. Replaced all bedding, food ect. The rest of flock acting like normal. Should know more soon, then treatment can begin to the rest of flock. Thank you!!! All will keep you apprised. This is the only online site that helped!
     
  9. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member

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    Sorry for your loss, but you did the right thing. Curiously, which of the four labs did you go to?
     
  10. zhairdzinr

    zhairdzinr New Egg

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