Hens haven't started laying...34 weeks

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by zclight, Aug 22, 2016.

  1. zclight

    zclight Out Of The Brooder

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    I have 4 white orpington hens. They are 34 weeks old and haven't started laying any eggs. (even though I do tell them they need to start earning their keep lol) I'm in South MS area. Any ideas?
     
    Last edited: Aug 22, 2016
  2. TheGooch

    TheGooch Just Hatched

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    You have Roosters.
     
  3. carlf

    carlf Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Are you sure? Do they free-range or penned up? If free-ranging, pen them up for week, they might be hiding the eggs somewhere.
    Are they doing the "egg song"?
    Do they squat for you?
    Post a pic of your birds.

    If none of the above, after 34 weeks, its chicken soup.
     
    1 person likes this.
  4. MrsRubbler

    MrsRubbler Just Hatched

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    Hmmmm.... If they free range, my guess is they're hiding eggs from you. Easy fix- pen them up for a week and encourage them to lay in the nest boxes by adding a couple golf balls in them. Once they get the hang of it, go back to free ranging them and they'll probably head to the nest boxes when they want to lay an egg.
    If they're currently penned up and not laying.... I suspect you actually have roosters or some real defective hens!
    Update us on their living situation please!
     
    1 person likes this.
  5. donrae

    donrae Hopelessly Addicted Premium Member

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    Pics of the birds?

    Free ranging?

    What are you feeding?

    Any illness in your flock?
     
    1 person likes this.
  6. zclight

    zclight Out Of The Brooder

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    Thanks for all the info. Yes they free range. I will pen them for a week and see what happens. I don't believe they are roosters. No crowing or roo behaviors. They are fed laying crumbles.

    I'll post some picts this afternoon.
     
  7. junebuggena

    junebuggena Chicken Obsessed

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    Feeding layer to birds that are too young can slow development. It is designed for actively laying birds only. It does not have a high enough protein content for growing and maturing birds.
     
  8. sweetbeak

    sweetbeak Chillin' With My Peeps

    Hi, my black orphington hens didn't lay until after 37 weeks. Be patient as they are slow developers.
     
  9. zclight

    zclight Out Of The Brooder

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    Thank you! I am new and did not know that. Do I feed the start/grower until they actually start laying?
     
  10. junebuggena

    junebuggena Chicken Obsessed

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    Layer feed is for actively laying birds only. It has just enough protein for egg production, but not enough for growing and developing birds. Also, the high levels of calcium can do some serious damage to internal organs, if fed to non-producing birds for too long. There is no magic ingredient in it that will make them lay sooner or produce more eggs. And for most small flock keepers, it's not the best choice of feed.
    Feeds like unmedicated starter, grower, all flock, or flock raiser are safe for all ages, stages, and genders. The higher protein content of those feeds also helps speed up molting, and reduces egg eating and feather picking. It also helps offset any low protein treats and helps keep production up during the hot summer months.
    Honestly, there are far too many benefits of feeding a higher protein feed to ever bother with layer. The only thing that layers need in addition to feed is a source of calcium, like crushed oyster shell, offered separately.
     
    Last edited: Aug 24, 2016

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