Hens no longer lay eggs

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by Mifferette, Nov 25, 2010.

  1. Mifferette

    Mifferette New Egg

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    Nov 25, 2010
    Hi!

    I was just curious what most people do when their hens no longer lay eggs. Do you keep them?
    Has anyone run into any bylaws issues with the city when you hen stops laying eggs?

    Thanks!
     
  2. Jajika

    Jajika Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Dec 24, 2007
    Northern California
    Not sure what you mean about "bylaws" in terms of keeping chickens who no longer lay?

    I can't see why there would be any ordinance regarding your private pet issues? What about dogs or cats who are too old to reproduce? Same thing.,

    In terms of "older hens" I think it is a personal preference. I'm a backyard, suburban chicken owner. I don't harvest my chickens, just the eggs. All of my chickens have names and they are my pets.

    I have one hen, Hannah Banana, who is nine years old. I can't tell if she lays eggs, but she broods two to three times a season. I have a few others who are five years old. I see them sitting on the nest fairly often.

    Bottom line: In my world, they live until they die. I love them all and do everything I can to keep them healthy and safe. I know I'll be extremely sad when the day comes. For now, they are active and happy.

    That's all I want.

    Geri
     
  3. Mifferette

    Mifferette New Egg

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    Nov 25, 2010
    Jajika,

    What I mean by bylaw issue is that there often is a restriction on the number of hens that can be kept, so if your hen no longer lays eggs and you plan to keep your chickens as pets to live out their lives, than you may exceed the number of allowed chickens if you get more for eggs or meat purposes. I was just curious how people get around this.
     
  4. Jajika

    Jajika Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Dec 24, 2007
    Northern California
    I see what you mean now, so thanks for the further explanation.

    I also clicked on the link where there was further discussion. It appears there are several solutions and issues, and it depends on your property, your need for laying chickens and your willingness -- or not -- to slaughter for meat.

    So, it will be up to you to work out your community limit for chickens, keeping "little old hens" or giving them away.

    Good luck. And, you asked an excellent question. No one offered you a firm solution as there isn't one.

    Geri
     

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