Hens or Roosters...how to tell

Discussion in 'What Breed Or Gender is This?' started by tlarson, Oct 21, 2013.

  1. tlarson

    tlarson Out Of The Brooder

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    Oct 18, 2013
    Holcombe, WI
    I recently bought 10 Black Star "hens" that were supposed to start laying in about a month or so I was told. I am fairly new to raising chickens, but I'm pretty sure that 5-6 of these "hens" are really roosters.

    I read that Black Star roosters would be black with white and hens are black with brown. While most of mine are black with brown a lot of them look like roosters. They are very tall and have thicker legs then my other hens, and I have yet to catch one in the laying boxes. I know for a fact that one is a rooster because I saw him mating one of my other hens.

    Is there a way to tell for sure if they are roosters?
     
  2. popsicle

    popsicle Chillin' With My Peeps

    Post some pictures.

    I have a hen that mounts other hens. I also have some hens with thick legs.

    Where did they come from? A hatchery or somebody that was breeding their black stars? If a hatchery, they are most certainly all hens. If they came from somebody breeding existing black sex links they could be anything. However, some people legitimately sell black sex links, if they have a red rooster and barred hens.
     
    Last edited: Oct 21, 2013
    1 person likes this.
  3. tlarson

    tlarson Out Of The Brooder

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    Oct 18, 2013
    Holcombe, WI
    They came from somebody who was selling them from her flock. It was on craigslist and has since been removed, but I believe she posted them as Black Stars (not sex links) and said they would all be laying in the next month. I will post pictures soon
     
  4. donrae

    donrae Hopelessly Addicted Premium Member

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    Black star is a brand name for a black sex link. Roosters are colored like barred rock hens, black and white striped. Hens are black with red/gold throats or chests.

    If your birds aren't barred, they could still be roosters, just not black star/black sex link roosters. Post a pic or two, let us know how old they're supposed to be and we'll help you out.
     
  5. tlarson

    tlarson Out Of The Brooder

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    Oct 18, 2013
    Holcombe, WI
    Here are some pictures. I hope they're are good enough for somebody to help me out. [​IMG] The 5th picture is the one I saw mounting a hen and I would say is definitely a rooster.



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    Last edited: Oct 21, 2013
  6. enola

    enola Overrun With Chickens

    Better pictures would help.

    But some of them are not black stars. To me they look like some one sold you a group of mixed breed roosters that happen to be mostly black colored.

    Sorry . . .
     
    Last edited: Oct 21, 2013
  7. tlarson

    tlarson Out Of The Brooder

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    Oct 18, 2013
    Holcombe, WI
    so you do think they are all roosters though?
     
  8. popsicle

    popsicle Chillin' With My Peeps

    I think they all look like cockerels. Looks like somebody got some "Black Stars" and bred them. They may or may not have known any better, and thought they were selling all pullets. The sex-link trait only works in the first generation cross.
     
  9. tlarson

    tlarson Out Of The Brooder

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    Oct 18, 2013
    Holcombe, WI
    thank you for everyone who posted...I guess I got taken advantage of. I would assume the lady knew what she was selling as she told me she had about 75 birds and sold at swap meets. At least I only paid $5 bucks a piece and they should make some pretty good chicken soup!

    You can eat roosters can't you?
     
  10. Hischick

    Hischick Out Of The Brooder

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    My Coop
    Yes, you can eat them. They are best when they are young, though. Otherwise they do get tough.
    We harvested ours not long after they started crowing.
     

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