Herbs with antiviral properties

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by annagoodspeed, Mar 24, 2017.

  1. annagoodspeed

    annagoodspeed Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jan 24, 2017
    Central Idaho 3000 ft
    So, I keep reading threads that are addressing the many viral diseases of poultry, and a lot of them say, 'this is a virus and so antibiotics are useless, there is nothing you can do.'

    As an herbal enthusiast who likes some actual studies to back up claims, I remembered that there are at least several herbs with demonstrated antiviral properties, two in particular against herpesviruses, which is what Avian Pox and Marek's are.

    I am not proposing that these herbs would cure an existing outbreak, but I do think that they might help prevent, or at least lessen some symptoms, amd since there are no pharmaceutical treatments for viral diseases, hey, why not try?

    Prunella vulgaris, aka all heal, or self heal, is a common, easily grown member of the mint family that is mild flavored and edible. Interestingly, it is very well regarded by both Chinese traditional medicine and western herbalism. A tea is the usual method of ingestion. I remember one study saying it is best used at the beginning of an outbreak..thinking that using herbs as part of the diet during the disease prone spring and falll seasons might be a good aproach?

    Lemon balm, Melissa Officinalis, also from the mint family. It is easliy grown too, but has a strong citrus scent that I am thinking would not be too palatable for them. Maybe a tea with other flavors added?

    Nigella sativa is an easily grown herb, an annual flower. It is really prominent in Mideastern herbology. It is a seed, also known as black seed, black cumin seed, kalongi, so to be clear make sure to go by the latin when looking for it. You can get it by the pound online, and through mideast grocery stores. There are studies on this as a poultry feed additive, so definitely not harmful. I will post links in subsequent posts since I keep losing my text when going away from this page...sorry.

    Just saw a paper on what herbs are used in Africa for chicken diseases in general, they had cayenne and aloe at the tops of the lists.

    There are plenty other antiviral herbs, but hesitate to post them as I am not sure if there would be toxicity issues for poultry. All heal is so benign, totally edible and a member of a well known non toxic family...
    Also, I have been feeding it to my birds since they started showing signs of what looks like wet and dry pox, and the only thing happening, big knock on wood here, is a fast recovery. Mostly I have been crumbling tops and adding them to their feed when I mix and start the ferment, and also two days of herb tea as water. I started using it after the wet pox symptoms started appearing, a little slow on the uptake of this idea, sorry birds...
    (Symptoms - started with very small round black spots on combs, including the only rooster so thinking not from injury, then a hen with a swollen shut eye and lethargic, eye back open and chipper in a couple days, then three hens plus the cockbird lethargic, a cough in one, a swollen eye in another, open mouth breathing, a day of funky poo from two, a couple lethargic days, then an upswing into currently normal behavior, heard a new cough yesterday, but all are eating and active today....pox or something else? No bad smell, the little discharge I saw was clear and bubbly , no smell, gone quickly...
    No fatalities. Misdiagnosis? Other possibilities?)

    So, wondering if anyone else has experimented with any antivirals and can add to this list?

    Links to come...
     
    Last edited: Mar 24, 2017
  2. annagoodspeed

    annagoodspeed Chillin' With My Peeps

    60
    26
    56
    Jan 24, 2017
    Central Idaho 3000 ft
  3. annagoodspeed

    annagoodspeed Chillin' With My Peeps

    60
    26
    56
    Jan 24, 2017
    Central Idaho 3000 ft
  4. annagoodspeed

    annagoodspeed Chillin' With My Peeps

    60
    26
    56
    Jan 24, 2017
    Central Idaho 3000 ft
    Looks like whole olive leaf is an antiviral, here is a study on poultry....

    https://www.idosi.org/gv/gv13(4)14/27.pdf

    In another direction, lysine is used in humans for herpes virus outbreaks. The thinking is that high arginine foods promote outbreaks, while high lysine foods reduce and shorten. In general, most seeds are high in arginine, and meats, fish, dairy, soy, are high in lysine.

    I didn't mention Oregano as I thought it was mostly antibacterial in action, but am seeing that it is also antiviral in action.
     
    achiekitty likes this.

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