Here Be Chickens (Harvster's tractor)

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by harvster, May 29, 2011.

  1. harvster

    harvster Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 19, 2011
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    The tractor was finally completed a few days ago. I didn't take many pictures during construction but there are a couple.
    The overall dimension are 10ft by 5ft. The coop is 4X5 and the run is 6X5 plus the 4X5X18" high area under the coop. The run has access points at the screened end and under the coop itself at the other end. 1/2 " vinyl dipped hardware cloth covers the entire run area.

    The coop back opens up completely for easy cleaning. The vinyl in the bottom and on the poop board simply slide out the back. The automatic coop door is Lexan run off of a 7.2 amp hour Panasonic battery. It should only need to be charged every few months. The coop has an external egg box and a side door for access to the food and water area. The front windows are approximately 18"X 12" and covered in hardware cloth. I also have framed Lexan covers that will be hinged on top and installed when the weather turns cooler. There is additional vented at the ridge line and on the gable ends. The gables will also have covers for the winter. It has Ondura roofing from Lowe's that we painted.

    There are two trailer jacks with 10" no-flat tires that can raise the coop for transport around the yard. I can get up to about 8" of clearance while pushing the coop. This makes for easy travel over ground that is not always smooth. It's heavy and while I won't say it's real easy to move, I can move it by myself without a lot of effort. It balances well and is sort of like pushing a large wheel barrow.

    There is 2 ft of 2X3 vinyl coated welded wire that lays flat around the coop. It is hinged at the bottom (by hinged I mean stapled so it can rotate up for moving). The ends have additional panels that fold out on the sides and then fold out again to overlap the side to give complete coverage.

    It turned out well and the chickens love it.[​IMG]

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    Last edited: May 29, 2011
  2. Kudzu

    Kudzu Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 27, 2011
    Superb
     
  3. speedy2020

    speedy2020 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 24, 2010
    Where do you get the wheel? I am consider adding to my coop so can be move.
     
  4. Kerry in Wa

    Kerry in Wa Out Of The Brooder

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    May 6, 2011
    Love it! The trailer jacks are genious!
     
  5. harvster

    harvster Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 19, 2011
    SE PA
    Quote:The wheel itself is a Marathon Industries 10 inch flat free caster available through Amazon. The jack part is a from a boat jack trailer that was purchased locally. You can find the jacks all over and can get them on sale for $19.99. They usually come with small wheels so I welded the larger caster to the bottom of the trailer jack.
     
  6. speedy2020

    speedy2020 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 24, 2010
    Quote:The wheel itself is a Marathon Industries 10 inch flat free caster available through Amazon. The jack part is a from a boat jack trailer that was purchased locally. You can find the jacks all over and can get them on sale for $19.99. They usually come with small wheels so I welded the larger caster to the bottom of the trailer jack.

    Can you push that coop around by yourself? My is little smaller then your, but I am using 3/4" plywood box and 50 years shingle. It is about 600-700lbs.
     
    Last edited: May 30, 2011
  7. harvster

    harvster Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 19, 2011
    SE PA
    Yes, I can push it by myself. My wife can push it by herself too. I think mine weighs in at about 500-600 pounds. Before I mounted the wheels I put a pipe under the coop on the cement floor of the garage and found the balance point. The last time we moved it, we moved it all the way across the yard under a tree because of the current heat wave. We steered it around a septic system pipe and moved it a total of about 150 feet. It only took a 2-3 minutes for the trip. I could have reduced weight in a few areas (especially the roof) but I had a vision.[​IMG]
     
  8. bryan99705

    bryan99705 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Nice coop, love the trailer tongue jacks. [​IMG] Do you secure the birds inside the coop before moving to prevent leg injuries? Looks like a bit of a pain to get into the coop for cleaning and maint but like the overall concept. Might have to steal a couple of you ideas [​IMG]

    Let me guess what the vision was..... I'm only doing this once so I'm doing it right! I hope! [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: May 30, 2011
  9. farmerinKC

    farmerinKC Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 5, 2011
    Kansas City, Missouri
    I really like your tractor-it is a lot like the one my son built for me. I think ours is a little smaller-but still very heavy. I just bought two trailer jacks yesterday at Harbor Freight for it. Your picture makes me rethink where I was going to put them. I was going to put them on the end of the coop part-but you said you found the balance point. So I believe I should try to do that too, some how. Thank you for posting your pictures-the wheels are one of the last things I have to do to complete mine and seeing your pictures will help me get it right. I think your chickens will be very happy in their nice home!
     
  10. hispoptart

    hispoptart Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 14, 2011
    NW Colorado
    Could you post a close-up of the trailer jacks? I guess I am not quite sure how they lift the coop. I need laymen terms LOL
     

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