here is the video of my bobble head chicken what is wrong

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by amberroswell, Jul 12, 2010.

  1. amberroswell

    amberroswell Out Of The Brooder

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    Jul 2, 2010
    north muskegon
    i have already lost 3 baby to this, and about a day or two after they start this they pass away, what is going on? anyone have any ideas? the video is at this link
     
  2. ekemily

    ekemily Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 8, 2010
    Fairhope, AL
    do they have any other symptoms... discharge from anywhere? Assuming you haven't hatched them, have you tried contacting the person you got them from?
     
  3. amberroswell

    amberroswell Out Of The Brooder

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    Jul 2, 2010
    north muskegon
    I contacted the breeder he said he has never seen or heard of anything like this. they have all been eating and drinking good, the 2 cochins we never that active from the beginning but always ate, drank and grew good just like the others. there are no other symptom that i have seen besides the turkin that passed this morning did poop green before she passed but that is all none of the other ones had green poop
     
  4. amberroswell

    amberroswell Out Of The Brooder

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    Jul 2, 2010
    north muskegon
    the cochins did seem to keep their eyes closed alot as you could see in the video not very active and eyes closed. so this must be contagious? how do i protect the other babies that have been by them.
     
  5. ekemily

    ekemily Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 8, 2010
    Fairhope, AL
    Maybe someone will look at this and know exactly what it is. I'll be watching the thread because I always love a good mystery. [​IMG] The only thing I found that might help is this:

    Avian Encephalomyelitis

    Synonyms: epidemic tremor, AE

    Species affected: The disease is most prevalent in chickens less than 6 weeks of age. Pheasants, corturnix quail, and turkeys are natural hosts as well, but less susceptible than chickens. Ducklings, young pigeons, and guinea fowl can be experimentally infected.

    Clinical signs: Signs commonly appear during the first week of life and between the second and third weeks. Affected chicks may first show a dull expression of the eyes, followed by progressive incoordination, sitting on hocks, tremors of the head and neck, and finally paralysis or prostration. Affected chicks are inactive. Some may refuse to walk or will walk on their hocks. In advanced cases, many chicks will lie with both feet out to one side (prostrate) and die. All stages (dullness, tremors, prostration) can usually be seen in an affected flock. Feed and water consumption decreases and the birds lose weight. In adult birds, a transitory drop (5-20 percent) in egg production may be the only clinical sign present. However, in breeding flocks, a corresponding decrease in hatchability is also noted as the virus is egg- transmitted until hens develop immunity. Chickens which survive the clinical disease may develop cataracts later in life (see Table 2 ).

    Transmission: The virus can be transmitted through the egg from infected hen to chick, accounting for disease during the first week of life. The disease can also be spread through a flock by direct contact of susceptible hatchlings with infected birds, accounting for the disease at 2-3 weeks of age. Indirect spread can occur through fecal contamination of feed and water. Recovered birds are immune and do not spread the virus.

    Treatment: There is no treatment for outbreaks. Infected birds should be removed, killed and incinerated. Recovered chicks are unthrifty.

    Prevention: A vaccine is available.
     
  6. CaliBlueChicken

    CaliBlueChicken Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 18, 2009
    SF Bay Area
    Hello,
    Poor little chicks [​IMG] I also don't know what this is but I am posting in hopes someone else might know. As for contamination... coming from a nursing standpoint, I would be sure to wash my hands before and after any contact with ANY of my chicks or thier food, water... surroundings. Best wishes.
     
  7. amberroswell

    amberroswell Out Of The Brooder

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    Jul 2, 2010
    north muskegon
    it says that Avian Encephalomyelitis is a vitamin E deficiency, should I get some vitamin E for his water
     
  8. ekemily

    ekemily Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Fairhope, AL
    I don't see why putting vitamins in their water, like Poly-vi-sol, would hurt. It is a children's vitamin that is sold at most drug stores and wal-mart. Get the kind with NO iron. Hope this helps. At least I can give you a *bump*

    edited to say: what have you been feeding them?
    Also, the vitamin E problem you're now talking about is not Avian Encephalomyelitis, but avian encephalomalacia (crazy chick disease), which does not sound like what you are dealing with.
    Also, I'm just guessing here. I am not a vet.... just trying to problem solve and help you out! [​IMG]

    -em
     
    Last edited: Jul 12, 2010
  9. Jenski

    Jenski Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jun 17, 2008
    Middle Tennessee
    Sorry about your chick. What are the living conditions? Type of feed? Do they have access to lukewarm/room temp water? What type of bedding is in the brooder? What is the exact brooder temperature? How old are they? Are they kept with others the same age, or in a mixed-age group? Did you get them as day-olds?
     

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