Herniated navel? Help appreciated

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Faraday40, Jul 16, 2014.

  1. Faraday40

    Faraday40 Crowing

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    Below are my 2 worst chicks from yesterday's hatch. I'm very concerned about the 1st one pictured below. It was the only shipped egg that hatched, It hatched OK, on time, & all by itself , but it has a nasty navel. (herniated?) I was very surprised that it lived through the night & was walking around by morning. I kept these 2 chicks in the incubator last night when I removed the rest.

    Last night I swabbed Chick #1's navel with a little iodine. Today I rinsed area with water & applied triple antibiotic ointment.
    Will navel eventually go into body on its own? I've never seen anything like it! Is there anything I can do or do these chicks always die? It's running around the incubator right now, so I'm quite amazed
    CHICK 1:
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    CHICK 2:
    This chick hatched slowly & got dried membrane glued to it. It looked weak, so I rinsed it off, gently removed the membrane, then popped it back into the incubator. Now seems perky, and the navel has a scab. I put some ointment there.

    [​IMG]

    1. Can I put these with the healthy ones?
    2. Are the chances for survival OK?
    3. Any suggestions for future care?
     
  2. luvmichx

    luvmichx In the Brooder

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    It looks like an umbilical hernia. I just lost one two days ago to this but hers was very severe and she had ended up losing her yolk sac. Keep these two separate until the hernia dries up and falls off on it's own. Don't pick the scab. Also don't put with other chicks as they may pick at it and make things worse. If the chick is eating, drinking and pooping chances are it will be fine. Also don't put too much pressure on the chicks abdomen when picking up as you could cause the hernia to rupture and then that is pretty much a death sentence.

    Best of luck, let us know how things turn out.
     
  3. Faraday40

    Faraday40 Crowing

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    UPDATE:
    I'm hoping some one out there had a similar problem & can let me know how this looks. We still have both special needs chicks from above. (On a positive note, they have company in the ICU.)

    CHICK #1 is now named HOPE b/c we "hope" it lives. I wanted to let it have a chance, so I kept things clean & applied triple antibiotic ointment 1-2xs per day.

    The pics below are HOPE at 9-10 days old. I thought it would have died or gotten better by now. It's eating, drinking, & pooping. The feather development looks slower, but it has energy to run away from my hand. Does HOPE have hope?
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    CHICK #2 We call this one MIRACLE, b/c it's a miracle it's alive. This one was trapped in a shell and took forever to hatch. Then had stuff glued to it & a raw navel. Within 24 hours, it had perked up. Unlike the 1st chick, this one could probably be put with the others, but it must stay in the ICU to keep the first chick quiet.

    Miracle at 9-10 days:
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    Will the first chick ever heal? If so, any guesses as to how long? Will the lump shrink (get "absorbed"), does the large scab fall off, or will the chick always have a bump?
    Thanks in advance for any help &/or suggestions.
     
  4. Looks like the chicks were removed from either the nest or from the incubator before all the egg yoke sack was absorbed. Try to keep your peeps warm and quite in a dark area for 48 to 72 hours after they hatch. I promise you that you won't loose any growth potential. In fact the first chick still looks WET. Mama nature has a plan for all of her children and the baby chick plan requires a long rest and relaxation period after they've hatched but before they start actively foraging.

    chick #1 looks like a pullet. Chick #2 looks more like a baby rooster. Good luck.
     
  5. Faraday40

    Faraday40 Crowing

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    Great news:
    At 18 days old, the large scab completely came off. It was there this morning & nothing's noticeable now. I allowed the two from my ICU to join the others in the grassy play yard. No scuffles, so they'll be sleeping in the garage tonight with the rest of chicks.
     
  6. Faraday40

    Faraday40 Crowing

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    What a huge difference! I honestly didn't think this chick would make it. So glad it did.
    [​IMG][​IMG]
     
  7. luvmichx

    luvmichx In the Brooder

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    Glad to see its doing so well!! Pretty chick...perhaps a leghorn??
     
  8. Faraday40

    Faraday40 Crowing

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    She/He is a Coronation Sussex that my daughter hatched as part of her experiment. She wanted to compare hatch rates of shipped eggs vs backyard eggs. This chick is from the 3rd & final trial of shipped eggs. 8 out of 12 eggs developed & were alive on day 18. Only this one managed to hatch, so it was the lowest hatch rate for the shipped eggs.(The highest was 60% for shipped eggs) The backyard eggs had 85-90% hatch rates when put in the same incubator at the same time. My daughter even collected our eggs 4-5 days before the start of incubation. Although there were some uncontrolled variables, I still think she did a good job for a 9 year old.
     
  9. Faraday40

    Faraday40 Crowing

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    Just an update for anyone who wants to see how things turned out.

    This chick was called Hope. We 1st hoped it would live, then later hoped it would be a female.
    I truly thought it was a male, but when I showed the breeder a pic, he told me she looked female & his line got pick early.
    He was right. Hope grew up into a hen.
    . [​IMG] [​IMG]

    She laid beautifully pink eggs & we couldn't help but incubate a few.

    Her chicks are 1/2 lav orp & 1/2 coro sussex. My son insisted on keeping one (below) & now I'm glad that we did.
    [​IMG]
     
  10. Faraday40

    Faraday40 Crowing

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    Sadly "Miracle's" story did not have the happy ending we wanted.

    She grew into a fine, healthy pullet. Miracle, Hope, & another chick "Cheeks" bonded in the brooder. The "3 amigos" always stayed together. When they were about 22 weeks old and just about to start laying, a Cooper's Hawk attack killed our Miracle. The 3 Amigos became 2. RIP little girl
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