Hey Quail Peeps!

Discussion in 'Quail' started by itsy, Jul 9, 2011.

  1. itsy

    itsy Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Hi everyone. [​IMG]

    I'm sure I've seen some of you folks on other parts of the forum, but I wanted to say hello. Mr. ModelA suggested I come on over to this section to do some research. I usually frequent the meatie section first before reading elsewhere.

    I've got quite a few pullets, a cockerel and 13 meat chickens. I'd like to get into quail for both their meat and eggs. I've been thinking Coturnix. I'd like to get quail that I could keep easily in our winters as well as the hot summer. I ate my first quail in a restaurant about 6 months ago and thought to myself that I could cook it better than they did! I can't seem to find quail meat anywhere - or rabbit meat for that matter.

    I'll be searching through your posts a bit and I hope you don't mind a newbie pestering ya'll with questions. I'll try to search first, though!

    Nice to meet you.
     
    Last edited: Jul 9, 2011
  2. MobyQuail

    MobyQuail c. giganticus

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    Quailtropolis
    [​IMG]

    p.s. watch out for the polar bears...
     
  3. TwoCrows

    TwoCrows Show me the way old friend... Staff Member

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    New Mexico, USA
    My Coop
    Yep...this is the place to be to get all the information on quail. Anything you need to know, somebody will have an answer for you.

    Welcome to the Quail forums!! [​IMG]
     
  4. itsy

    itsy Chillin' With My Peeps

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    New England
    Polar bears?? [​IMG]

    Funny you should mention them... I had a dream I was out by the barn the other night. It was pitch black and silent. I was all alone. As I walked towards the barn, a giant polar bear walked out from the other side and stared at me. I froze and then it felt like I was electrified as I ran back to the house. I woke up.
     
  5. the outdoorsman

    the outdoorsman Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jun 22, 2011
    Phoenix AZ
    Have I met you if not nice to meet you.
     
  6. JJMR794

    JJMR794 Overrun With Chickens

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    Quote:WHY YA GOTTA BE LIKE THAT? I MEAN COMON' MAN A BEAR'S GOTTA EAT RIGHT? [​IMG]
     
  7. the outdoorsman

    the outdoorsman Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jun 22, 2011
    Phoenix AZ
    Quote:WHY YA GOTTA BE LIKE THAT? I MEAN COMON' MAN A BEAR'S GOTTA EAT RIGHT? [​IMG]

    lol
     
  8. JJMR794

    JJMR794 Overrun With Chickens

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    BROOKSVILLE FL
    Quote:WHY YA GOTTA BE LIKE THAT? I MEAN COMON' MAN A BEAR'S GOTTA EAT RIGHT? [​IMG]

    lol

    DONT LAUGH SEALS ARE #1 ON THE MENU.... PENGUIN IS #2


    ( JUST KIDDIN'.... SORRY BUT IT WAS JUST TOOOO GOOD TO RESIST! [​IMG] )
     
  9. [​IMG]
     
  10. Denninmi

    Denninmi Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:If you've raised chickens, Coturnix will be easy. They are a lot more "domesticated" than other types of quail, and really do act basically like chickens overall. They still are too wild to "free range" -- if they get out, they probably will take off, albeit slowly -- I've had some of mine escape a few times while I had the door open, and I just walk over and pick them up, they are pretty tame.

    They're really fun little birds -- easy to take care of, start laying eggs at 5 to 6 weeks. I haven't eaten a quail yet. I generally don't eat the eggs at this time mainly because I just don't need them, having chickens, ducks, and turkeys, but they are fine, equal to about a 6th of a chicken egg. I've actually been using mine in mesh bags to hang in young apple trees to keep the deer from eating them, which seems to be working.

    Commercially raised quail sold in stores and served in restaurants could be either bobwhite or coturnix, hard to say, I think both are sold, but probably more likely to be bobwhite. Those are harder to raise, more "wild" and flighty, prone to eating each other.
     
    Last edited: Jul 10, 2011

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