1. If this is your first time on BYC, we suggest you start with one of these three options:
    Raising Chickens Chicken Coops Join BYC
    If you're already a member of our community, click here to login & click here to learn what's new!

HOBLE BRACE FOR CHICKENS WITH INJURY OR HATCHED THAT WAY

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by Glenda Heywoodo, Feb 20, 2017.

  1. Glenda Heywoodo

    Glenda Heywoodo Chillin' With My Peeps

    982
    85
    106
    Dec 19, 2016
    Cassville Missouri
    HOBLE BRACE FOR CHICK
    Glenda Heywood
    if yourchicken has a hip injury or some other need for brac to walk this is very good advise from a frien of mine DCTownsend. She has raied and bred lots of Peafowl over the long years.


    HOBLEBRACE
    you might make a shoe for it like DCT's article says try the hobble brace as it will make the chicks leg come down as it is holding it up.
    THIS DOES WORK
    Here is my friend DCTownsend's help on the matter read the one that fits you best
    Orthopedics for Poultry Made Easy for Beginners
    ORTHOPEDICS FOR POULTRY MADE EASY FOR BEGINNERS
    By D.C. Townsend
    These treatments have been tested and proven effective. I developed them for peafowl but they
    may be used for any poultry. The key to success is to begin treatment promptly. In some cases delay will kill or cripple the chick
    HOBBLE BRACE
    ACHILLES TENDON OUT OF THE GROOVE
    When the Achilles tendon slips out of the groove on the hock joint, a peachick will not be able to
    straighten its leg. The problem needs prompt attention because the struggling peachick will put
    its weight on the hock joint which will damage the skin and cause swelling in the joint. The tendon
    can be pushed back in place with just one finger or a very gentle squeeze between the thumb and index
    finger. Sometimes just one treatment will give a complete cure that seems like a miracle. Other
    times several treatments are needed. Stubborn cases require advanced treatment that is too difficult to
    explain here. I treated both legs of a peachick for two weeks; She grew up to be a healthy peahen.
    CROOKED TOES
    Sometimes a peachick hatches with toes rolled into a fist. They may straighten out on their own
    in the first day of life. If they do not do so, I make a CHICK SHOE (see illustration below) from
    black pipe cleaner available in the crafts department at Wal-Mart. I use black ones because
    bright colors are more likely to be pecked by other peachicks. One packet of Westrim Crafts Chenille
    stems costs 89 cents and will last for years. Any kind of half inch wide tape can be used to attach the CHICK SHOE to the toes, but I prefer Johnson and Johnson First Aid clear tape. I cut a piece a quarter inch long for the middle toe. I cut another piece the same length and split into two quarter inch-wide pieces for the other toes. Eight hours of treatment is usually enough time to end the problem on a day-old peachick.
    CHICK SHOE
    Not Actual Size
    HALF SHOE
    Not Actual Size
    In the 1995 hatch, I had a number of peachicks with a kink in the outer toe of one or both feet.
    They were well past a week old when I decided that I must do something about it. I made HALF SHOES of black pipe cleaner. I tore off a quarter inch-wide stripe of duck tape several inches long and secured
    the HALF SHOE to the middle and the outer toe. Several days of treatment were needed. Some of the
    HALF SHOES came off and had to be taped on again, but all treated peachicks had straight toes at the
    end of the treatment. There is a young peacock that I missed treating. Now it is too late and he will
    always have a kink in his outer toe.
    STRADDLE LEGS
    This problem can occur even if you take the precaution of having quarter inch hardware cloth
    under your peachicks. Sometimes it is caused by the struggles of a chick with its toes rolled into
    fists. In that case, both problems must be treated at the same time. I cut a piece of tape four or
    five inches long and from the HOBBLE BRACE with the legs far enough apart so that the peachick can walk. The tape must go the whole way around and cover its sticky side so that it does not stick to the
    peachick's fuzz when it sits down. Usually 24 hours of treatment is sufficient, but sometimes more is
    required. CHICK SHOES and the HOBBLE BRACE can be used at the same time.
    Glenda L Heywood Cassville Missouri
     
    Last edited: Feb 20, 2017
  2. Pyxis

    Pyxis Dark Sider Premium Member

    11,214
    4,319
    466
    Mar 27, 2012
    Vermont
    My Coop
    While these are nice pictures, did you get permission from the original poster to repost them? I know I might be a little upset if someone went posting pictures of my birds and didn't ask me first, or reposted my pictures without permission or my knowledge, especially if I was in one of them.
     
    Last edited: Feb 20, 2017
  3. Glenda Heywoodo

    Glenda Heywoodo Chillin' With My Peeps

    982
    85
    106
    Dec 19, 2016
    Cassville Missouri
    Soy Free Diets For Poultry
    James Hermes, OSU Extension Poultry Specialist
    In recent years, there has been interest by small scale poultry producers to not feed soybean meal to their chickens. The reasoning behind this trend varies but most producers have health concerns regarding soy for both their birds and humans eating poultry products, meat and eggs, from birds fed soy. In addition, there is concern that most soy produced in the US is a “genetically modified organism” (GMO); most soy has been genetically manipulated so that it is resistant to Roundup, a widely used herbicide. And finally, many are concerned that soy is not locally grown, most is grown in the Midwest and transported to the Pacific Northwest by rail car. This is of particular concern for those who consider themselves “localvores”, individual that prefer to only consume products produced close to home.
    Why is soybean meal a major ingredient in poultry feed (about 30%)? For decades, soy has been known to be an excellent feed ingredient for poultry and other livestock; this is why it will be produced at levels expected to exceed 3.5 billion bushels in 2010. It is a high protein feedstuff (>45% crude protein) and it contains high levels of linoleic acid, an essential nutrient that is required in animal diets. Since it is so useful and available, the poultry industry has little interest in finding alternatives. Therefore there has not been a lot of work on other ingredients that may be adequate substitutes for soy. The question then arises, what is an adequate substitute.
    First, an adequate substitute must have an adequate supply, have the proper nutrient levels and be affordable. So, what is available in the Pacific Northwest that is an adequate soy substitute?
    In the past, animal products such as, fish meal, meat meal, meat and bone meal, blood meal, and poultry by-product meal have been used successfully in poultry diets. They are all high in protein and other nutrients; however, the supply has been reduced in recent years because feed mills that make feed for ruminant animals, cattle and sheep, can no longer use these products due to the potential of “Mad-Cow disease. Poultry are unaffected by this problem. Other issues with animal products include food safety and the potential of receiving contaminated product. And finally, organic production doesn’t allow the use of animal products in diets.
    Cereal Grains
    Cereal grains are typically low in protein, between 7% and 12%, and generally high in fiber. The energy level (starch) varies from very low (oats) to quite high (corn). Some cereal grains such as wheat and barley contain compounds that are not well digested by poultry and may need supplemental enzymes added to the feed to aid digestion if fed in levels above 10 or 20% in the diet.
    Legume grains
    This group includes the dry beans, peas, and lentils. Since soy is a legume these would appear to be an obvious choice. However, compounds including, tannins, oligosaccharides, and enzyme inhibitors that are found at high levels in most of these grains severely affect growth in poultry, especially in beans, with peas providing adequate growth at 30% in the diet or less. Since soy is processed with heat, these compounds are virtually eliminated as a problem. So with some processing, beans and peas may become a useable ingredient, more work is needed.
    Other
    Canola and Camilina, are relativelyPoultry new as a poultry feed ingredient but show some promise, however they are not without problems too. They are related to mustard and cabbage and as such they include compounds that can cause problems when fed to poultry. Canola, when fed at amount higher that about 10% in the diet, cause eggs produced by many brown egg layers to smell and taste fishy, and Camilina has a similar property and is only approved to be fed to broiler chickens as a level of less that 10%.
    Conclusion
    Poultry feeding is heavily dependent on soy as an ingredient. It will take some time to identify adequate substitutes that are locally produced and will support poultry growth and egg production. Unlike ruminants, which can thrive on forages, poultry require a balanced diet. Therefore, poultry diets must contain proper ingredients at the proper levels for productive chickens.
    .

    [​IMG]
    Soy Free Diets For Poultry | Small Farms Programs
    In recent years, there has been interest by small scale poultry producers to not feed soybean meal to their chickens. The reasoning behind this trend varies but most producers have health concerns regarding soy for both their birds and humans eating poultry products, meat and eggs, from birds fed soy...
    smallfarms.oregonstate.edu




    Glenda Heywood Most inormative please read: In the past, animal products such as, fish meal, meat meal, meat and bone meal, blood meal, and poultry by-product meal have been used successfully in poultry diets. They are all high in protein and other nutrients; however, the supply has been reduced in recent years because feed mills that make feed for ruminant animals, cattle and sheep, can no longer use these products due to the potential of “Mad-Cow disease
    [​IMG]
    Glenda Heywood
    Canola, when fed at amount higher that about 10% in the diet, cause eggs produced by many brown egg layers to smell and taste fishy, and Camilina has a similar property and is only approved to be fed to broiler chickens as a level of less that 10%.


    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Feb 20, 2017

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by