Hog shed = coop?

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by iLikeMineFried, Oct 2, 2016.

  1. iLikeMineFried

    iLikeMineFried Out Of The Brooder

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    I have an old hog shed on my property and was thinking of making it into another coop, since my main coop/run is at capacity and I would like to hatch some offspring from my current flock. The hog shed is bigger than the main coop but needs some work. Any experienced coop builders have some ideas for me? I know the floor needs to be filled in, and some of the gaps in the tin siding patched, add a roost and a door, and some screening over the vent on the top of the wall. Anything else I am missing? My main coop is 6x9 with 10 birds, this hog shed is about 8x12. I also have too many roosters, so until I decide what to do with them, they would be in the hog shed.[​IMG]

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  2. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler! Premium Member

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    Before spending any time and money refurbing this shed, I'd make sure the structural framing is not rotting beyond repair anywhere.

    Definitely a lot of gaps to fill...strongly suggest wire mesh apron to keep any predators/pests from digging in under walls.
    Needs more ventilation than the one existing vent, depending on your climate it might need a LOT more.
    Metal can gather condensation inside which can be a problem humidity-wise...so might want to insulate roof.

    Depending it's structural condition, and your goals, needs, and resources.....
    ......you might want to go whole hog(haha!) with concrete foundation, new roof and maybe siding.
     
  3. Intheswamp

    Intheswamp Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I'd say it has a lot of potential.

    The first thing I'd do would be get in there the next time a decent rain falls and check the roof for leaks....I see a nail hole or two in the roofing. Some good caulk and a caulking gun are inexpensive and work great

    Tighten up loose screws/nails. Replace any badly rotted structural wood.

    Insure that the 1sqft of ventilation per chicken is followed. You might could insure that by building a screened door out of 2x4 welded wire fencing with some 1/2" hc layered with it. You need both ventilation and a door....two birds with one stone. Though, it appears you *may* have some good venting around the eaves.

    Put an apron of mesh fencing around the perimeter unless the coop will be inside of a secure run.

    Build a run unless the chickens will be 100% free-range.

    You've got a lot to work with. Get the roof in good shape, clean it out, and go from there! The rest of it will simply be regular chicken appliances....feeders, waterers, roost bars, nestboxes, etc.,.

    Best wishes,
    Ed
     
  4. Folly's place

    Folly's place Chicken Obsessed

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    I confess that it looks pretty grim as it is, but if the framing is sound, it's a start. Removing all or most of that metal siding would help, with hardware cloth at least on the south side. It looks like a hot box in summer in the sun! Dig- proofing the foundation, and good drainage are essential too. I'm sure the builders in our group will have lots of good ideas here. Mary
     
  5. iLikeMineFried

    iLikeMineFried Out Of The Brooder

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    The husband and I talked it over, and he would like to do meat birds in this shed. We live in northern WI, so spring starts in late May, summer is July and August, Fall is September, Winter starts mid October till May(sometimes have snow in June). Meat birds are ready for harvest fairly quickly, so do you think if we get birds in May, that they will be ready by October? I have already cleaned out the shed. It looks bigger now that it's empty. Lots of work to do, but we have all winter to do it, and some materials on hand already from other projects.

    Our to do list:

    inspecting roof and structure
    caulking nail holes in the roof
    build and install mesh door
    secure tin siding/cover gaps
    open up walls for a ton of ventilation, screen with hardware cloth
    fill in around base of shed, bring up level of the floor to bottom of siding
    put in roosts/other chicken appliances
    get more info on meat birds

    There is no room for a run, so these birds would free range when we are home to supervise (lots of raptors here). In a few years we may revamp this shed for year round use, but it's not monetarily possible now. Any babies I get in the spring from my layers will have to be housed elsewhere, sold, or replace poor layers.

    Any other suggestions on our change of course would be appreciated!
     
  6. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler! Premium Member

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  7. iLikeMineFried

    iLikeMineFried Out Of The Brooder

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    ok, I will do that! Thanks!
     
  8. Folly's place

    Folly's place Chicken Obsessed

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    Cornishx birds don't handle summer heat well at all; consider spring or fall for them. Eight weeks total, or get the Freedom Rangers from Penn., and plan on birds that actually range, and twelve weeks. Mary
     
  9. 3riverschick

    3riverschick Poultry Lit Chaser

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    Hi,
    What are the chances the birds could pick up e coli from ground on which hogs had been previously?
    Best,
    karen
     
  10. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler! Premium Member

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    CX will range if properly prompted...best thing is to raise some layer chicks with them and manage their feed timing.
     

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