Homemade Chicken Feed 200 lbs @ $0.39 per Pound

Discussion in 'Feeding & Watering Your Flock' started by eldonrgv, Jan 24, 2017.

  1. eldonrgv

    eldonrgv Chillin' With My Peeps

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    So I decided to make a homemade chicken feed for my meat birds, something less expensive and more nutrition f.or my birds. I was spending $40 every 1.5 weeks on high protein turkey starter and cracked corn giving me 100 lbs of feed. Turkey starter is good but cracked corn is not so good in nutrition for the birds I've been told.
    So I headed to our local feed store and got as follows.

    50 lbs Wheat $12.00
    50 lbs Whole Corn $7.50
    50 lbs Steamed Rolled Oats $10.00
    7.5 lbs Safflower Seeds $12.00
    4 lbs Nyjer Seeds $8.00

    Total 161.5 lbs grain $49.50

    Then I headed to our supermarket and got as follows.

    10 lbs Green Split Peas $7.50
    10 lbs Yellow Split Peas $7.50
    10 lbs Lentils $7.50
    10 lbs Brown Rice $7.50

    Total 40 lbs grain $30

    Adding everything up totals 201.5 lbs of feed for $79.50 which gives me $.039 per pound. My birds seem to love it and it looks **** good.
    [​IMG]
     
  2. lazy gardener

    lazy gardener True BYC Addict

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    I would be interested to see how the nutrient value of you mix at $19.50/50# compares to pre mixed layer feed at $13.50/50#. I know there are nutrient programs out there where you can plug in your grains/seeds and weights and it will calculate your nutrient value for you. It does look good... good enough to eat!
     
  3. chickens really

    chickens really Overrun With Chickens

    Google Rochester Hatchery......Look at their 2017 catalogue inside you will find a recipe for Homemade feed for MEAT BIRDS......


    Good luck....


    Cheers!
     
  4. Egghead_Jr

    Egghead_Jr Overrun With Chickens

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    It's seriously lacking in protein and that is a key ingredient for all birds especially meat birds. The highest protein content in that mix is from lentils (26%) and next is Safflower (18%) and then it plummets for the rest of ingredients. Wheat and oats being 13% and most everything else 8-10. Your net is somewhere around 13% or less protein and you want it up to 20 or higher for meat birds. Maybe supplement cat food or something to get them what they need.
     
  5. Howard E

    Howard E Chillin' With My Peeps

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    So you were spending $20 for each 50# bag?

    I have not priced feed for meat birds, but in addition to selling Purina bagged feed for $16 to $17 per 50# bag, our local feed store also has it's own mill. They will make me a layer ration using their corn and bean meal, and a commercial supplement mix (from Purina), in 500# batches and that sells for about $100 or $10 per 50# bag.

    You might ask if they do something similar vs. trying to formulate your own.
     
  6. eldonrgv

    eldonrgv Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thanks everyone for all information. Our issue here is that we have one local feed store so prices are high. The turkey starter goes for $28.99 and cracked corn $9.99, one supplier and a lot of demand so if you're lucky you'll find your feed but sometimes racks are empty and have to wait at least a week for the supplies arrive, that's a lot of time to wait if you're running low on feed for your birds. I don't know much of percentages of protein on feeds but after seeing lots of folks preparing their own and using oats, corns, wheats, blah blah blah....I decided to give it a try. Here's info of Nutritonal Facts I got of the packages and WebMD regarding the food I used and its nutritional info.

    Info according to Nutritional Facts on WebMd Food Calculator
    http://www.webmd.com/diet/healthtool-food-calorie-counter

    Oats
    Protein 56%
    Fat 15%
    Fiber 64%
    Calcium 8%

    Wheat
    Protein 43%
    Fat 5%
    Fiber 94%
    Calcium 6%

    Corn
    Protein 31%
    Fat 12%
    Fiber 48%
    Calcium 1%

    Lentils
    Protein 72%
    Fat 0%
    Fiber 64%
    Calcium 0%

    Brown rice
    Protein 29%
    Fat 8%
    Fiber 26%
    Calcium 4%

    Green Split Peas
    Protein 97%
    Fat 4%
    Fiber 201%
    Calcium 11%

    Yellow Split Peas
    Protein 80%
    Fat 6%
    Fiber 224%
    Calcium 4%

    Info according to package:

    Safflower seeds
    Protein 10%
    Fat 22%
    Fiber 38%
    Calcium No Data

    Nyjer seeds
    Protein 16%
    Fat 25%
    Fiber 20%
    Calcium No Data

    Totals on one pound ratio:

    Protein 48.2%
    Fat 10.8%
    Fiber 86.5%
    Calcium 4.9%

    Now, if this info is somewhat correct, all I need to do is add some calcium supplement to the mix.

    Please enlighten me. I've never done any feed mix before so please provide a recipe I can use if this one is no good.
     
  7. lazy gardener

    lazy gardener True BYC Addict

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    Last edited: Jan 24, 2017
  8. Howard E

    Howard E Chillin' With My Peeps

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    OP.......it has been over 40 years since my last class in animal nutrition. But I do remember a few things and one of them was I came away thinking that balancing my own feed ration for any animal was something I was not keen to try on my own. Too much at stake.

    If you do not already know what a Pearson Square is, I'd stop what you are doing and try to find a local source for your feed.

    OTOH, you may not have enough birds, or a tractor large enough to spin it, but if you did, you could always buy yourself a used portable mix mill and grind your own, using pre-calculated ration formulas along the lines of what my local feed store does.
     
  9. eldonrgv

    eldonrgv Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Its not a chart. There's a search window, enter grain and search. It'll then ask how many servings. 4 servings = 1 lb press calculate and it'll give you all nutritional facts.
     
  10. lazy gardener

    lazy gardener True BYC Addict

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    Those numbers don't match any numbers common to the animal feed industry. It's possible that they are showing so high b/c they are based on 4 human servings. There fore, for instance, 1# of oats would be 4 servings, and make up 56% of the protein needs of the human daily diet. I'm not sure. But, I'm thinking you should use charts based on animal feed to avoid any confusion.
     

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