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Homemade Incubator

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by alan anderson, Feb 22, 2016.

  1. alan anderson

    alan anderson Out Of The Brooder

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    I made an incubator that measures 2 feet X 2 feet X 31 inches front to back.Question is how big and where do vent holes need to be? Thanks for any help.
     
  2. alan anderson

    alan anderson Out Of The Brooder

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    May 14, 2014
    Nobody know where to put vent holes? Where are all the incubator experts?
     
  3. lazy gardener

    lazy gardener Chicken Obsessed

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    That's the million dollar question. Or should it be the 20 dollar question? I used a very scientific method when I built mine. It's styrofoam, w/thermostat/fan/2 x 40W bulbs, about 14 x 15 x 8". After I got it wired and running, I poked a 1/2" hole in the top, and an other one by the fan intake. Then let it run for a while. Where ever I found a warm spot, I took a sharp pencil, and made an other hole. I kept making holes here and there. Some for air ventilation, some because I wanted to drop a thermometer sensor in a particular spot. If I didn't like a hole, I covered it with duct tape. The best suggestion I can give you is to find some one who has a bator similar size to yours, and go by the hole set up they have, based on location of heating element and fan. Not having that as an option, just start making holes. It would make sense to make a hole for drawing in fresh air, and one at the top for venting out extra warm air. Otherwise, as long as you can hold temp and humidity, IMO you can't have too much ventilation. Those little egglets need lots of air.
     
  4. JetCat

    JetCat Chillin' With My Peeps

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    it depends on your design. if it's a still air then the intake hole/holes need to be on or near the bottom and the exit on or near the top. for a forced air the intake are normally behind the fan (on the suction side) and the exits can be anywhere in a positive air flow area. on a forced air the further away from your humidity pan your exit vents the more consistent your humidity will remain.
     
  5. alan anderson

    alan anderson Out Of The Brooder

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    May 14, 2014
    Thanks for the replies and advice.
     

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