Homeschooling curriculumn for raising chickens?

Scoop

Songster
11 Years
Jan 16, 2009
1,775
8
161
Central PA
Does anyone know if any publisher they are using has a planned curriculumn for incubating and then raising chickens? By planned, I mean with workbooks, tests, etc. A quarter or semester would be great. Any ideas would be great.
 

kees

Songster
12 Years
Feb 5, 2008
1,357
7
194
What grade level curriculum are you trying to obtain?

Suzy



Have you tried looking at online agricultural extension websites? Even if their lessons are for a higher level, they can easily be modified.
 

gumpsgirl

Crowing
Premium Feather Member
11 Years
Mar 25, 2008
14,106
41
311
Virginia
Try your 4-H extension office. They should be able to help out lots in that area.

I've also bought and used the book "Your Chickens" by Gail Damerow. That has a whole lot of great advice for kids in it.
 

Scoop

Songster
11 Years
Jan 16, 2009
1,775
8
161
Central PA
I am looking for 10th grade level. I hadn't thought of the 4-H, that may help. I'll also check out that book if there are any bookstores around here anymore. (They are all closing!)
Thanks everyone.
 

gumpsgirl

Crowing
Premium Feather Member
11 Years
Mar 25, 2008
14,106
41
311
Virginia
I bought my book from Amazon. I also noticed that our TSC had it after I bought it over the internet. Do you have a local TSC?
 

Chickenmaven

Songster
10 Years
Feb 6, 2009
2,064
12
181
Michigan
I found things here & there, online. I googled "4-H, poultry" and got pieces of different education plans: diagrams of chickens, charts for incubation, showmanship stuff for fair... 4-H does have curricula for sale, too.
 

kycklingar!

Songster
10 Years
Feb 9, 2009
320
6
129
Linköping, Sweden
Well, I can't direct you to any specific all-in-one resources, but I'd do a 3-prong approach. (after all, this is the beauty of home-schooling! We learn that information is integrated!!! A sorely lacking concept in public schools.)

First, I'd use this forum and read up on all the hatching info they have. It is a lesson in using electronic resources and messageboards for support and information. This would also cover the basics of incubation and hatching.

Second, If you have a biology text geared towards anyone from 9th to 11th grade, it will have a chapter on the "continuity of development." Here you can learn all the stages of animal development from zygote to blastula to embryo to fully functioning organism. This will cover what's going on in the egg.

Third, and one of my favorite topics to teach in Biology, is the purpose of eggs, and why bird eggs develop outside their bodies instead of inside like mammals. A biology text would cover that in the reproduction chapter. There are many types of animals. Oviparous (laying eggs), Viviparous (giving live birth,) and even some ovoviviparous animals like cockroaches and some snakes that technically have full eggs that develop and hatch inside them, then they give birth. Most mammals have social structures that allow males to care for females while they are gentler on their bodies during fetus development. But a bird that has to run around and find food, or that might be a prey animal would have a lower likelihood of success in pregnancy if her body was constantly giving its energy to embryos. So, it makes more sense to put TONS of nutrients in one place, and then be able to set the egg down somewhere, so it is developing somewhere other than inside the body.

I diverge. Anyway, good luck on the home schooling! I'm behind you 100%!
 

Scoop

Songster
11 Years
Jan 16, 2009
1,775
8
161
Central PA
I actually think I may have seen that book at TSC. I am going there on Friday so I'll check it out!
 

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