Homing Pigeon

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by lillybaby, May 14, 2010.

  1. lillybaby

    lillybaby Out Of The Brooder

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    Jul 16, 2007
    So, I'm no really sure which topic to post this in, but because I'm concerned about bird diseases, I figured this was close enough. Recently, a homing pigeon decided to move in with our flock. We contacted the American Racing Pigeon Union with the number on the bracelet on his leg and a person called us claiming it, but he never showed up to collect the bird. So fine. We have a pigeon. He gets along with the hens; there's been a little pecking, but they all established the hierarchy pretty quick and now he/she is roosting with the girls. My question is, should I be concerned about any bird diseases that could be transmitted from the pigeon to the girls? Are there other issues I should be concerned about or do we just let them be? Thanks in advance for any thoughts you all have.
     
  2. ellieroo

    ellieroo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    My husband has been racing pigeons for decades. If you are taking a trip or know someone who is send this guy. He should go home from the new release.How far are you from the birds ex owner and what direction is he from you?? Go at least 50 miles towards him.If you wish to keep they do share some bugs coccideos (sp) is one. As long as the nose cere on his beak is white and his pop is good he should be OK.
     
  3. sourland

    sourland Broody Magician Premium Member

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    Sometimes once they get stronger from being fed, they will leave on their own. I have Birmingham rollers, and occasionally a young homer will trap in with them. I isolate it, medicate it, feed it up and release it in a week or so. Generally they leave and go home. Many homer people will not want a lost bird back-I guess they feel that their homing instincts are inferior. I did have one guy who came from Staten Island to pick up a lost bird (60+ miles.) When I questioned him about Why?, he told me that the bird had been raced 5 times for 2 wins, 2 seconds and on the fifth race a very high percentage of birds had been lost- possibly some atmospheric disturbance. He was retiring the bird to the breeding loft. Just keep an eye on your chickens. They have already been exposed. Chances are that all is fine.
     
  4. ellieroo

    ellieroo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    The last two yrs have been very hard on the birds for whatever reason. Birds that have been flown for 4yrs and won from 300/ 500 miles away have gotten lost?? In Europe two years ago an entire race flight failed to come home ??? [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: May 15, 2010
  5. lillybaby

    lillybaby Out Of The Brooder

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    Jul 16, 2007
    Thanks for the info; that's really interesting! According to the owner, he let the bird go about 30 miles to the west of where we live and the owner lives about 30 miles to east of us. His beak looks fine and there's nothing unusual about his poo. We had a bad hail storm right before he showed up and I think he might have hurt his wing; it doesn't appear broken, maybe just sore? He's eating and walking around, so I suppose he might want to go home after he convalesces for a few days more.
     
  6. ellieroo

    ellieroo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    We had a bird from Canada with us for a couple of months vacation ended he then went home! Yes the hail storms and wind sheer are very hard on the birds. We had one show up with a french band on ?? Never figured that one out! [​IMG]
     

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