Homing turkeys

Discussion in 'Turkeys' started by kinnip, Nov 11, 2008.

  1. kinnip

    kinnip Chillin' With My Peeps

    Feb 24, 2008
    Carrollton, GA
    How long does it take to home a turkey? I have him in an extra large dog crate, but he's used to free ranging. I can't stand seeing that sweet, majestic animal in a cage.
     
  2. sandspoultry

    sandspoultry Everybody loves a Turkey

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    Why would you keep a turkey in a dog crate?????
    Steve in NC
     
  3. kinnip

    kinnip Chillin' With My Peeps

    Feb 24, 2008
    Carrollton, GA
    He's grown and not from here. He'll be free ranging when I let him loose. The dog crate is for homing purposes only, and if he want to sleep in it I won't stop him. I would never keep him in there indefinitely! I'm just not sure if 2 days is enough for him to understand this is home and not fly away, so he can be shot and mounted.
     
  4. sandspoultry

    sandspoultry Everybody loves a Turkey

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    Quote:He will never learn where home is in a dog crate, take a pic before you turn him out as that is probably all you will get. Turkeys are flock animals and creatures of habit. To learn where "home" is they need to be able to move around and explore it. Sorry to be so blunt

    Steve in NC
     
  5. CrowinKing

    CrowinKing Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I would never mount a turkey they taste to good [​IMG] !!! I'd find something bigger though and keep him in it for no less than 2 wks!!! What kind is he?
     
    Last edited: Nov 11, 2008
  6. monarc23

    monarc23 Coturnix Obsessed

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    Quote:lol a mounted animal is only the "skin and fur" or in this case would be skin and feathers. The meat can still be eaten.[​IMG]


    As for the post, if it was me, i wouldnt try getting him to stay around in a dog crate...i'd put him in a fenced in area..and if he can fly clip his wings..if he's people friendly in no time he should stay around hoping to see you all the time. We free ranged our trio...they went over to the neighbors a few times thoughand he deffiantly did not appreciate that...we soon found thema home where they were cooped.
     
  7. CrowinKing

    CrowinKing Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Not if you take it to a taxidermist [​IMG] ! Then you don't get anything [​IMG] !
     
    Last edited: Nov 11, 2008
  8. monarc23

    monarc23 Coturnix Obsessed

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    Quote:umm....we have over 8 taxidermied animals in this house...we ate the meat from 4 of those...sorry but you dont seem to know what you're talking about. If you dont knwo how to skin the animal yourself and take it to the taxidermist whole ofcourse you wont get hte meat back....unless you ask for it (and probably pay extra for that) your taxidermist probably loves you...free meat.

    I'm waiting on my buck now from the taxidermist, we just ate the last of his meat abotu 4 months ago. All we took was the head and the skin the whole way to the hind legs (it's only going to be a head mount) if it was a whole mount i'd had to of skinned the whole deer and brought in the whole deer "coat" and head....you dont have to take the taxidermist the whole body...its' mroe work for him *them* anyhow that way. It's curtious to skin teh animal yourself if you know how to do it.
     
  9. monarc23

    monarc23 Coturnix Obsessed

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    Info for prepairing a deer for the taxidermist:

    Step 1 in caping a whitetail deer: Slice the hide beginning at the middle of the rib cage just behind the front legs and continue around the deer behind the shoulder.

    Step 2 in caping a whitetail deer: You will now need to cut the hide around the legs. Make your incision just above the animal's knees and work your way around until you meet your first incision. Then slice from where you made your incision at the shoulder area, down the back of the leg until you meet the incision you made just above the knee of the deer.


    Step 3 in caping a whitetail deer: You now can pull the skin up and off of the animal, similar to how you would take a shirt off of a child, when you reach the head and neck area you will need to make a cut around the neck going a deep as you can get. Once you have scored your neck area you should be able to grab the deer's antlers and twist the head off the body.

    After doing this you will be left holding a deer head with a lot of hide attached to it. If you have the ability to go straight to the taxidermist you should wrap the hide in a plastic bag and get it to there as quickly as possible. If you will be unable to go directly to the taxidermist, you should wrap the hide in a plastic bag (garbage bags work great), and freeze the hide immediately. Freezing the hide stops the growth of any bacteria that may be harmful to the hide. Hides that are not frozen immediately risk hair slippage and rot. A good point to remember is you can never send the taxidermist too much cape, however, it is possible to give your taxidermist too little cape. Any excess cape can be cut off and thrown away in the taxidermist's shop, but a cape with not enough hide cannot be stretched to fit the forms. You may be out of luck if you cut the cape too short. "

    http://www.associatedcontent.com/ar...repare_your_trophy_for_the.html?page=2&cat=11
     
  10. CrowinKing

    CrowinKing Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I don't take the chance of skinning my own I don't want to mess it up! The only thing i have mounted is grouse, and waterfowl I'm a wing shooter! I don't hunt large game haven't since I was a boy! And deer the only thing we take there is the head and cape I'm not that dumb I do my own deer butchering!
     
    Last edited: Nov 11, 2008

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