Honey water ,Miss Prissy?

Discussion in 'Raising Baby Chicks' started by MissJames, Nov 2, 2008.

  1. MissJames

    MissJames Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Oct 17, 2008
    Coastal SC
    I noticed in another thread that Miss Prissy mentioned giving her just shipped chicks honey water.Can you tell me how this is done? I have a one gallon waterer and chicks shipping on Wed.I pray they arrive by Sat.
    My husband and I love the idea of using what you have, if you can,so any homemade ideas are appreciated for our first chickies.
     
  2. ChickenToes

    ChickenToes Chillin' With My Peeps

    May 14, 2008
    NE Wisconsin
    When the chicks arrive you can give them sugar water, honey water, or molasses water for a day or two to perk them up and give them energy. I have a 1 quart waterer for chicks, so I can't help you with exact measurements. My advice is just to mix in enough sugar/honey/molasses until the water tastes slightly sweet.
     
  3. MissJames

    MissJames Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Oct 17, 2008
    Coastal SC
    Quote:Thank you. I hope they get here soon!
     
  4. miss_jayne

    miss_jayne Lady_Jayne

    Jun 26, 2008
    Columbiaville, MI
    i am just wondering, if honey is a good idea as it has bacteria in it that is safe for adults, but not children. would the same be true of chicks?

    not arguing the above comments, just pondered that when i read it. botulism can be present in honey as well as plants that may be hazardous to chickens.


    this is from Websters online dictionary:

    Honey is also used in traditional folk medicine. It is an excellent natural preservative. Honey is, however, not always healthy. Because it is gathered from flowers in the wild, there are certain times and places when the honey produced is highly toxic. Rhododendrons and azaleas have nectar that is highly poisonous to humans although harmless to bees, producing deadly honey. In some areas of the world the hives are emptied immediately after the flowering season and cleaned of any residue to prevent accidental poisoning. There are stories that poisoned honey was used in warfare in ancient times, but they are unverifiable.

    Honey (as well as other sweeteners) is also potentially extremely dangerous for infants. This is because, when mixed with the non-acidic digestive juices of an infant it creates an ideal medium for botulinum spores to grow and produce toxin. Botulinum spores are among the few bacteria that survive in honey, but also are widely present in the environment. While these spores are harmless to adults, because of stomach acidity, an infant's digestive system is not yet developed enough to destroy them, and the spores could potentially cause infant botulism. For this reason, it is advised that neither honey, nor any other sweetener, should be given to children under the age of 18 months.
     
  5. MissJames

    MissJames Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Oct 17, 2008
    Coastal SC
    Quote:I'm thinking that a baby chick's digestion is very different from a baby human's.Babies can only tolerate breast milk or a similar formula for quite a while,whereas chicks come out eating real food.
    I was just hoping to find out how much to put in a gallon of water.
     
  6. bluebirdfarm

    bluebirdfarm Chillin' With My Peeps

    when you sub honey for sugar you use half as much , so............. i would find out how much sugar and just divede it by half , hope this helpd !
     
  7. the simple life

    the simple life Chillin' With My Peeps

    Send a pm to Miss.Prissy and ask her, she is a wealth of information and I am sure she will not mind helping you out with that. Good luck.
     
  8. Katy

    Katy Flock Mistress

    I wouldn't use molasses...I believe it's a laxative to a chicken.
     

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