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Hormones arrive @ 2 Dogs Farm

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by 2DogsFarm, Dec 20, 2010.

  1. 2DogsFarm

    2DogsFarm Chillin' With My Peeps

    Apr 10, 2009
    NW Indiana
    My 2 little chicks turned 4 months old this weekend.
    To celebrate this milestone, the little cockerel tired to mount his "sister"
    (they're probably are not related - picked from a group of 30 or more chicks).

    WTH?
    He hasn't even tried crowing yet!
    At least he knew better than to try anything with the Big Girls.
    They would have had him for lunch.

    Any tips or handling a teenage roo?
    I do pick him up and hold him until he settles, but I've been doing that with both babies to get them used to being handled.
    Also take them from the roosts by putting a hand under their breasts so they step onto my hand.

    I'd like a well-mannered rooster if I have to have one at all.
     
  2. sheaviance1

    sheaviance1 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Apr 7, 2010
    Tennessee
    When I first saw your topic title, I thought, oh great, octo-chicken here we come [​IMG]
     
  3. mulewagon

    mulewagon Chillin' With My Peeps

    691
    5
    128
    Nov 13, 2010
    Alabama
    Your main concern is to keep him from attacking humans. So start to train him immediately, before he gets the slightest idea of doing it.

    Keep on taking him off the hens, because that's what a dominant rooster does. Since you want to keep him easy to handle, carry him around a lot.

    Watch for signs he's challenging you: a stiff-legged sideways walk towards you or in a circle around you, or at a hen near you. Any time you see that, walk right back at him until he backs up, or pick him up and make him settle.

    I always back mine up, but if you want to keep him easy to catch, you may prefer holding, instead. If you have children, teach them to do the same thing, under supervision (but don't leave a small child alone with a rooster, because there's no margin for error).
     
  4. 2DogsFarm

    2DogsFarm Chillin' With My Peeps

    Apr 10, 2009
    NW Indiana
    Quote:[​IMG]

    I WISH!
    with the lack of eggage here (late hard moults & then freezing weather) I'd welcome one laying multiples!

    mulewagon:
    thanks for the tips on Rooster 101
    No kids here except when my farmsitter takes care of the hens & brings her daughter. I'll educate her even if it means daughter can't go in the coop.
    I'm hoping Little John will continue to think I Rule as he is turning into a handsome guy.
    BTW: pretty mule in your avatar!
     
    Last edited: Dec 20, 2010

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