horse med help

Discussion in 'Other Pets & Livestock' started by gaited horse, Aug 14, 2008.

  1. gaited horse

    gaited horse Merry Christmas!

    Aug 14, 2008
    Fernley, NV
    can a horse have a stroke
     
  2. WisconsinChick

    WisconsinChick Chillin' With My Peeps

    yes
     
  3. Bi0sC0mp

    Bi0sC0mp Chillin' With My Peeps

    442
    4
    141
    Apr 21, 2008
    Raiford,FLA
    yes a horse can have a stroke there are serveal differnt kinds of strokes a horse can have also
     
  4. gaited horse

    gaited horse Merry Christmas!

    Aug 14, 2008
    Fernley, NV
    Bi0sC0mp can you tell me more about horse strokes. my mom's 26 year old ex race horse was put to sleep do to we think he had a stroke but i can't find any thing about it.
     
  5. 5_chickz

    5_chickz Out Of The Brooder

    31
    0
    21
    Jul 28, 2008
    Sorry about your moms horse:( but I dont know that much about strokes
     
  6. helmstead

    helmstead Chillin' With My Peeps

    Mar 12, 2007
    Alfordsville, IN
    Stroke is the same in equids as it is in humans, so research on human stroke correlates to what happened to your mother's horse...so sorry for your loss.

    What is a Stroke
    A stroke, also known as cerebrovascular accident (CVA), is an acute neurological injury in which the blood supply to a part of the brain is interrupted. That is, a stroke involves the sudden loss of neuronal function due to disturbance in cerebral perfusion. This disturbance in perfusion is commonly arterial, but can be venous.

    The part of the brain with disturbed perfusion no longer receives adequate oxygen. This initiates the ischemic cascade which causes brain cells to die or be seriously damaged, impairing local brain function. Stroke is a medical emergency and can cause permanent neurologic damage or even death if not promptly diagnosed and treated. It is the third leading cause of death and the leading cause of adult disability in the United States and industrialized European nations.

    Types of stroke
    Strokes can be classified into two major categories: ischemic and hemorrhagic. Ischemia can be due to thrombosis, embolism, or systemic hypoperfusion. Hemorrhage can be due to intracerebral hemorrhage or subarachnoid hemorrhage. ~80% of strokes are due to ischemia.

    Ischemic Stroke
    In an ischemic stroke, which is the cause of approximately 80% of strokes, a blood vessel becomes occluded and the blood supply to part of the brain is totally or partially blocked. Ischemic stroke is commonly divided into thrombotic stroke, embolic stroke, systemic hypoperfusion (Watershed or Border Zone stroke), or venous thrombosis.

    Thrombotic stroke
    In thrombotic stroke, a thrombus-forming process develops in the affected artery. The thrombus — a built up clot — gradually narrows the lumen of the artery and impedes blood flow to distal tissue. These clots usually form around atherosclerotic plaques. Since blockage of the artery is gradual, onset of symptomatic thrombotic strokes is slower. A thrombus itself (even if non-occluding) can lead to an embolic stroke (see below) if the thrombus breaks off—at which point it is then called an "embolus."

    Embolic stroke
    Embolic stroke refers to the blockage of arterial access to a part of the brain by an embolus -- a traveling particle or debris in the arterial bloodstream originating from elsewhere. An embolus is most frequently a blood clot, but it can also be a plaque broken off from an atherosclerotic blood vessel or a number of other substances including fat (e.g., from bone marrow in a broken bone), air, and even cancerous cells. Another cause is bacterial emboli released in infectious endocarditis.

    Systemic hypoperfusion (Watershed stroke)
    Systemic hypoperfusion is the reduction of blood flow to all parts of the body. It is most commonly due to cardiac pump failure from cardiac arrest or arrhythmias, or from reduced cardiac output as a result of myocardial infarction, pulmonary embolism, pericardial effusion, or bleeding. Hypoxemia (low blood oxygen content) may precipitate the hypoperfusion. Because the reduction in blood flow is global, all parts of the brain may be affected, especially "watershed" areas --- border zone regions supplied by the major cerebral arteries. Blood flow to these areas does not necessarily stop, but instead it may lessen to the point where brain damage can occur.

    Hemorrhagic stroke
    A hemorrhagic stroke, or cerebral hemorrhage, is a form of stroke that occurs when a blood vessel in the brain ruptures or bleeds. Like ischemic strokes, hemorrhagic strokes interrupt the rain's blood supply because the bleeding vessel can no longer carry the blood to its target tissue. In addition, blood irritates brain tissue, disrupting the delicate chemical balance, and, if the bleeding continues, it can cause increased intracranial pressure which physically impinges on brain tissue and restricts blood flow into the brain. In this respect, hemorrhagic strokes are more dangerous than their more common counterpart, ischemic strokes. There are two types of hemorrhagic stroke: intracerebral hemorrhage, and subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    Intracerebral hemorrhage
    Main article: intracerebral hemorrhage
    Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is bleeding directly into the brain tissue, forming a gradually enlarging hematoma (pooling of blood). It generally occurs in small arteries or arterioles and is commonly due to hypertension, trauma, bleeding disorders, amyloid angiopathy, illicit drug use (e.g., amphetamines or cocaine), and vascular malformations. The hematoma enlarges until pressure from surrounding tissue limits its growth, or until it decompresses by emptying into the ventricular system, CSF or the pial surface. A third of intracerebral bleed is into the brain's ventricles. ICH has a mortality rate of 44 percent after 30 days, higher than ischemic stroke or even the very deadly subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage
    Main article: subarachnoid hemorrhage
    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is bleeding into the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of the subarachnoid space surrounding the brain. The two most common causes of SAH are rupture of aneurysms from the base of the brain and bleeding from vascular malformations near the pial surface. Bleeding into the CSF from a ruptured aneurysm occurs very quickly, causing rapidly increased intracranial pressure. The bleeding usually only lasts a few seconds but rebleeding is common. Death or deep coma ensues if the bleeding continues. Hemorrhage from other sources is less abrupt and may continue for a longer period of time. SAH has a 40% mortality over 30 day period.
     
  7. gaited horse

    gaited horse Merry Christmas!

    Aug 14, 2008
    Fernley, NV
    thank you so much for your help you guy's rock
     
    Last edited: Aug 15, 2008

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by