1. If this is your first time on BYC, we suggest you start with one of these three options:
    Raising Chickens Chicken Coops Join BYC
    If you're already a member of our community, click here to login & click here to learn what's new!

Horse names

Discussion in 'Other Pets & Livestock' started by abbygibson1212, Feb 4, 2016.

  1. abbygibson1212

    abbygibson1212 Chillin' With My Peeps

    221
    6
    61
    Nov 29, 2014
    Missouri
    I have a cremello qh gelding that I have for sale (or trade) and someone is VERY interested in trading me for him, they are wanting to trade me two palomino quarter horses, one mare and one gelding, that I really like. Now, nothing is official yet, but the waiting is killing me so I've decided to pass the time by picking out potential names. I knew as soon as I saw the mare that if I get her, I want to name her June. I don't know why. It's just seems right. But I'm having a little more trouble picking out a potential name for the gelding, so I need suggestions! (Besides Johnny and Benny) although I did consider following the Johnny Cash theme and going with Cash. But I'm not sure.
    Here they both are (blurry and with burrs in their manes)
    [​IMG]
    And here's the gelding
    [​IMG]
     
  2. Bunnylady

    Bunnylady POOF Goes the Pooka

    16,873
    1,140
    391
    Nov 27, 2009
    Wilmington, NC
    I love Palis- I have two myself.[​IMG] Those two look nice and fat in the picture, at least. I know you didn't ask about this, but as a person who has been around horses for a while, and been around people even longer, I have to wonder. This is the young horse that you can't ride and are having trouble handling, correct? And these folks want to trade you two horses for the one you can't ride? Sorry, but my antennae came up on this - what are these horses' "issues," that they are so eager to get rid of them? I'm not saying don't go for it, just hoping that you are proceeding with caution.
     
  3. abbygibson1212

    abbygibson1212 Chillin' With My Peeps

    221
    6
    61
    Nov 29, 2014
    Missouri
    Ah yes. Well I've been working with my gelding more, and I've had several other people out to ride him as well. And apparently I'm just the problem. A girl I went to school with was on him last week and she was going on about how great he is and how well trained and how his lope is just like a show horse. Which makes it extra frustrating that I have problems with him. So I went out and rode someone else's mare the other day to see if I could ride ok.. And no problems. I rode her around bareback and she listened to me and I wasn't nervous at all. So I guess me and my gelding are just not meant to be. And the people wanting to trade are older than me and have a lot more horse experience, and they already have a cremello gelding and want another cremello gelding. They only want two horses and they would like them both to be big cremellos, and since I would like two horses as well (and at least one of them be a mare) we would both be getting what we want. These horses aren't registered, so they may not be worth quite as much, but that's not what matters to me
     
  4. Mini Meat

    Mini Meat Chillin' With My Peeps

    Good looking Palominos. Your boy is handsome as well.

    As someone with over thirty years horse experience. I would recommend that when you do re home your gelding and move one to some thing new that you start with only one horse. When you have build a good and functional relationship with that horse then consider a second. I suspect (with very little info) that theses two are probable buddy sour and it will be very difficult for you to have a bond with either if you take both.

    This may be the reason behind the two for one offer. This situation may take you from the frying pan to the fire. At the very least make sure you see how they behave when separated before you consider taking either of them. A horse that is buddy sour is likely to develop the same problem with the next horse it meets.

    This offer may be perfectly legit but it raises red flags it my mind.
     
  5. abbygibson1212

    abbygibson1212 Chillin' With My Peeps

    221
    6
    61
    Nov 29, 2014
    Missouri
    I've had multiple horses before, the mare would be more for myself and the gelding more for my grandpa, sister, friends, etc. although I would ride him sometimes too if he wasn't getting enough time with everyone else. But I do understand your point on buddy sour, back when I had 3 horses, we had one that was crazy buddy sour, and I'll definitely make sure I don't get into that again. I'll be going to ride these two either this Saturday or next, and I'll be sure to find a spot where I can put some distance between them and they can't see each other so I can see how they do. Any other advice that I can check for while I'm there Saturday would be greatly appreciated. These horses are much closer to me than my gelding was and I'm taking things slower and a lot more cautious this time so that I get a horse that'll I want to keep forever
     
  6. shortgrass

    shortgrass Overrun With Chickens

    3,198
    556
    261
    Mar 14, 2015
    Northern Colorado
    We bred palominos when I was in school... Lol the stud was Shadow Chablis, so we named some of the foals;

    Shadows Bud Light- Buddy

    Shadows Genuine Draft- Sally.. Lol don't ask no clue how she became Sally...

    Shadows Blue Ribbon- Arrow, because he had an arrow for a snip ;)

    Shadows Bar None- that was a bay, Earl

    Snipper was a buckskin with a big ol snip lol


    Oh and Jackpot Speedy was my gelding, Jack :)



    Those were the memorable ones lol ;)
     
    Last edited: Feb 5, 2016
  7. Chickerdoodle13

    Chickerdoodle13 The truth is out there...

    6,802
    298
    331
    Mar 5, 2007
    New Jersey

    A few tips for when you go looking at the horses:

    -have the owner get on them first. If they are unwilling to do so, that always sends some red flags up in my mind. If they won't ride, ask if they have someone that will ride (I rode a pony someone had for sale once because his kids were afraid and the dad was too large). This will allow you to watch the horse from the ground and saves you from getting hurt right away. So many people say their horses are rideable when they are barely so.

    -bring a second opinion. You may be knowledgable about horses, but getting a new horse is exciting and may cloud your judgement. Bringing another knowledgable horse person along can help you make a more rational decision and they may pick up on things you haven't. Another example is when I went with a friend to look at a horse they were thinking of buying and they were ready to say yes that day. When I went with them, I saw the horse was lame in one foot. They had a vet out to X-ray the feet after my suggestion and the horse had terrible ring bone and arthritis that it probably would not have been rideable. Had I not been there, they would have bought the horse not knowing that.

    -if you are not sure about something, pay a vet for a vet check. They aren't usually that much and can save you loads of time and money down the road. It's not easy to get rid of a lame horse as a lawn ornament.

    -go back a couple times to look at the horses. The owners should be willing to let you look a few times before buying. If they are rushing you or saying "we have other people interested", that's a red flag. A horse is a huge decision and you don't want to be rushed into it.

    -it's never a bad idea to call unexpectedly one day and ask if the owners are around so you can stop by to look. The world of horse sales is not always an honest one, and I've known people to work horses to exhaustion before seeing a buyer so they are calm. I've also dealt with drugged horses from an auction. People can seem genuine but when it comes to horses, you should always be a little suspicious. I don't advocate just showing up but at least if you call that morning and ask, they won't have as much time to prepare for your visit.

    Good luck!
     
    1 person likes this.
  8. abbygibson1212

    abbygibson1212 Chillin' With My Peeps

    221
    6
    61
    Nov 29, 2014
    Missouri
    Now I want to know why her name was Sally...

    And thanks for the advice! Definitely planning on looking at them more than once and having them ride first, as well as a second opinion. As for the vet check I have never done that before but I'll look into it
     
  9. shortgrass

    shortgrass Overrun With Chickens

    3,198
    556
    261
    Mar 14, 2015
    Northern Colorado
    I'd have to second in the vet check. A must, IMO. This is going to be a lifelong friend (hopefully), so knowing that there isn't something lurking in their genes is paramount.

    I remember falling in love with a beautiful chestnut mare, begged my mom for her, did the vet check and she failed it. The owner didn't even know she had encephalitis, and she died 4 months later :( My mom was glad we did the vet check, even though I was really upset about it; she knew I wouldn't have been able to handle the loss, not to mention she had a price tag in the thousands of dollars...

    It's quite the investment, much like a car.. A car that you feed and give your time to in order for that freedom of a ride with natural a/c lol ;)

    Eta: I have NO real idea why she was named Sally lol, other than I have an aunt Sally; my mom was responsible for that one ha-ha ;)
     
    Last edited: Feb 5, 2016
  10. abbygibson1212

    abbygibson1212 Chillin' With My Peeps

    221
    6
    61
    Nov 29, 2014
    Missouri
    How do I go about getting a vet check? Would I call my vet or a vet that lives in her town?
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by