1. If this is your first time on BYC, we suggest you start with one of these three options:
    Raising Chickens Chicken Coops Join BYC
    If you're already a member of our community, click here to login & click here to learn what's new!

Horse question...

Discussion in 'Other Pets & Livestock' started by Arklady, May 8, 2008.

  1. Arklady

    Arklady Chillin' With My Peeps

    460
    0
    149
    Jan 30, 2007
    Kansas
    I bought a belgian mare, I wanted to know if anyone has inseminated horses before and what I might be looking at as to cost.

    Arklady
     
  2. Equest94

    Equest94 Chillin' With My Peeps

    514
    0
    151
    May 29, 2007
    New York
    It really depends on what stud you want to breed with. Most breeders charge a stud fee and collection fee plus there is vet costs (breeding exam, ultra sound, insemination fee, "check ups" etc) ...

    I'd average around $1,000 give or take...
     
  3. Rare Feathers Farm

    Rare Feathers Farm Overrun With Chickens

    It's very dependent on MANY factors...if the mare is easy to breed...(ovulates as expected, has good uterine tone, clean cultures, etc) then you could maybe expect to pay maybe around $300-$500 for the actual insemination process.

    The last time I inseminated a mare, it was over $5k because she was difficult to get to cycle, she had a uterine infection, the stallion had blood in its semen and it ended up dying two weeks after my mare was actually confirmed in foal. All in all, I had over $12k into the foal before she hit the ground! [​IMG]

    But the next time I breed one of my mares, I let the veterinary class at my college use her in their courses and it cost me less than $1000 for the entire thing (not included the $2500 shipped semen). [​IMG]
     
  4. BasenjiFan

    BasenjiFan Out Of The Brooder

    36
    1
    24
    Apr 8, 2008
    Arizona
    My last job was as a broodmare assistant manager at an Arabian breeding farm. So I have personally inseminated mares, and it's not that hard to do... IF you have someone experienced to teach you. Of course, with the equipment needed from semen handling to mare restraint, I'd probably opt to have someone else do it, especially if it was my first time.

    The easiest (and least expensive) way to monitor estrus is to use a teaser (we used a gelding that I gave testosterone to once or twice a month). Of course, if your mare is a flirt (and believe me, some ARE), or if she has silent heats, it won't tell you much. Your vet can also do ultrasounds to monitor ovulation (depending on your vet, the cost can vary, and if your mare takes a while to ovulate, the farm calls do add up). If you board your mare for this, as stated before, it can get pricey. I worked with a vet that had one of her clients bring their mare to the farm I worked at for breeding (to be done after she finished with the farm's horses and when we weren't using the breeding room - the farm charged $200 per use), so she didn't have to board... I don't know if your vet could do that for you, but it would cut costs if you don't have a suitable breeding facility.

    I have no basis for comparison, but I think the farm I worked at was a little expensive, but then, so are all horse related activities in the Sonoran Desert. They charged a flat fee for the breeding season of $250 (teasing, coordinating, assisting vet), plus $12.50 to $16 per day for mare care, depending on how you wanted your mare housed. That didn't include stud fee, semen container return charge, airport courier charge, meds, supplements, farrier services or vet bills, so really, you can spend as much as you want to... the sky's the limit with spending money on horses!:eek:

    Oh, and if you haven't already, I would have a vet do a breeding soundness exam before trying to breed her. She may have an issue that might affect her suitability for breeding - curable or not, it's always nice to know before spending money on mare care. Good luck!
     
  5. Keisha

    Keisha Chillin' With My Peeps

    440
    0
    149
    Apr 27, 2007
    Iowa
    I'm not sure on the prices of artificial insemination as we used a stud when we bred Lea. Are there any in your area?

    Whats your belgians name? I have a gelding named Duke hes a big sweetie.
     
  6. Equest94

    Equest94 Chillin' With My Peeps

    514
    0
    151
    May 29, 2007
    New York
    Random question:

    Is your mare a Belgian Warmblood or a Belgian Draft? Breed, bloodlines, show/work record can also reflect in the price of stud free and thus raise the over all breeding cost.



    I tried breeding my mare and took her to a breeding clinic, which was expensive. I spent over 3K and still no baby....

    As I have mentioned and as other's have pointed out there are many factors that come to play when trying to add up breeding costs. I'd go into this expecting to pay big money and hope for the best...

    Good Luck.
     
    Last edited: May 8, 2008
  7. Arklady

    Arklady Chillin' With My Peeps

    460
    0
    149
    Jan 30, 2007
    Kansas
    She is a belgian draft, and we do have a stud but he is a standard horse. So breeding with him is ok I just though maybe I should use another draft but don't know any in this area.

    Oh her name is Tink lol

    [​IMG]

    Arklady
     
  8. Equest94

    Equest94 Chillin' With My Peeps

    514
    0
    151
    May 29, 2007
    New York
    She is gorgeous! Her color is so rich!


    There are online sites that have stud searches too. I know equine.com usually turn up nice results...if your looking for a draft stud in your area, you could try that.

    I also know that Belgians (and other drafts) cross nicely with Thoroughbreds making a nice Warmbloody-looking riding horse...

    but it does narrow down to what the purpose of the foal will be....
     
    Last edited: May 9, 2008
  9. patandchickens

    patandchickens Flock Mistress

    12,521
    78
    341
    Apr 20, 2007
    Ontario, Canada
    Well, as far as who/what to breed to, what is the purpose of the foal?? Given the HUGE number of horses out there that don't have homes, it would seem important not to breed yet another unless it is part of a well thought out long range plan... [​IMG]

    There have GOT to be some decent Belgian stallions in Arkansas; and live cover is ever so much more economical than AI. Another factor to consider with AI is how experienced your vet is with doing it and what his/her success rate is. And unless this mare has had several foals in the past few more-or-less consecutive years, it would be HIGHLY worth shelling out for a breeding soundness exam, including having her cultured, if you are thinking of going in for AI - it can potentially save you from wasting a whole lotta cash, as I've seen a number of people do.

    Good luck,

    Pat
     
  10. Arklady

    Arklady Chillin' With My Peeps

    460
    0
    149
    Jan 30, 2007
    Kansas
    I understand that she has delivered a healthy male foal last year but she was left for this last season. She is 10 this year and just passed her coggins test and currently resides alone. We have two horses already and one is a 4 year old mustang stud so if we do nothing she will most certainly be bred by him. Which wouldn't be that bad as the foal would be larger than him and smaller than her perfect for plowing or some other light work such as a cart or wagon such as I wanted. I think a buggy would be too light and not worth the effort if I lived about 5 miles from town it would be nice to take him to the farmers market with some goodies.

    Who knows. I just am starting out but I am seeing myself with a few of these they are wonderful animals and I have dealt with them before. We are already looking for a place to get hay and found some that is 15 a round bale.

    As for her other issues he said she has never gotten hurt nor has she ever hurt anyone. Her manner is one of, 'I may look like I am being cool but I am watching you.' LOL

    Arklady

    edited for spelling errors.
     
    Last edited: May 9, 2008

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by