Horses: Winter Dandruff! HELP.

Discussion in 'Other Pets & Livestock' started by Equest94, Oct 3, 2008.

  1. Equest94

    Equest94 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    It's that time of year... the weather is starting to get bitterly cold (at least up here), blankets are starting to go on, and baths have stopped...

    my mare gets the worst winter drandruff ever! I know some cases are caused by skin issues such as allergies, lice, ringworm, etc; however none are the case with my horse.

    She is very thoroughly groomed everyday, but still is very flakey especially along her crest and mane. I tried using some leave-in conditioners and nothing seems to work. The problem goes away after the first bath of the season in Spring. It's not a huge deal, but she looks a bit gross now and I want to see if I could try to clean her up a bit better...


    Anyone have the same issues with their horses? Any suggestion on "miracle" products that work during the fall/winter seasons (hence no bath required)?



    Thanks in advanced!
     
  2. patandchickens

    patandchickens Flock Mistress

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    Have you tried adding oil to her feed? It can take a coupla months to see results.

    Otherwise, basically I'd say either live with it or get in some good aerobic exercise with a rubber curry or one of those nubbly grooming mitts [​IMG]

    Good luck,

    Pat
     
  3. Equest94

    Equest94 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I tried oil a while ago...didn't help. Her coat is naturally shiny and oily...so the extra oil made her super greasy...greasy + dandruff = gross. lol.


    Grooming-wise my arms got so muscular from that darn curry...I have larger biceps than the football players! [​IMG]
     
  4. chickypoo

    chickypoo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Well most horses are a bit flakey on the neck but if it is really bad you might be dealing with an allergy and the cold temperatures make it worse. Ever heard of MTG? It is supposed to be really good for skin conditions, but it is a liquid so I don't know if it would work in the cold.
     
  5. Cetawin

    Cetawin Chicken Beader

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    Okay I can tell you this...

    dandruff is basically a lack of moisture if there is no allergy etc etc.

    Even in winter, horses need moisture in their skin and hair that they would normal get from bathing, wiping down and rain. Their skin is designed to need it just as ours is. You need something to moisturize her skin and hair at least once a week regardless of the weather. Blanketing and stalling during the winter only allows the skin to dry out.

    I would try a spray on moisturizer that you can spray on her, rub in and wipe off weekly. Or, as I use them in healing skin products I make, Vitamin E oil or even better, Emu Oil. Rub it on and leave her unblanketed long enough for the skin to absorb it. It will not clog the pores and her skin and hair will love it! Emu oil also has natural healing properties that heal even psoriasis when applied directly to the skin.

    Remember that horses were meant to be in the elements and are happiest at 40 degrees. When we blanket them or barn them, we begin to affect their natural ability to handle and withstand the elements. Think 200 years ago...horses did not have blankets and barns, the herds roamed the land all 4 seasons and raised babies the same way. So, when we interfere with the natural course, we must give extra to the animal for what we are taking of their natural abilities. [​IMG]

    Good luck with her and try the Emu oil or at a minimum vitamin E. You can do it daily, every other day or weekly. You can use it on your own skin. Just make sure she gets moisture on her skin and hair weekly.
     
  6. Equest94

    Equest94 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    chickypoo:
    Yeah, I LOVE MTG - I use it on her tail and on her legs when she has a bit of rain rot and it works amazingly! However, it seems to make the dandruff worse... I was using MTG on her forelock to help grow the chunk back that she ripped out, and it just made the flakes that surfaced bigger...


    Cetawin:
    See, my mare's dandruff issue isn't any worse than a typical horse would get especially in the fall/winter season... it's just that her being a dark bay, her winter coats comes in black so the flaky-ness and powdering is more apparent... I brush her thoroughly everyday and she still looks horrid. I just want to find something that would help a bit...something that doesn't require an actual water bath or anything that will make her excessively oily. She has a naturally super shiny/oily coat and every time I use a conditioner or some sort of moisturizer on her she looks horribly greasy. Would the Emu oil have the same greasy effect? Do you have an idea where I can get it and about how much it costs? I've also noticed that her body look great - everything under the blanket is clean and smooth (not dandruffy), but the parts that stick out from the blanket, such as her legs, neck, and head have that powder...


    *Again, it's not a huge deal... we are not showing this winter season, and like I have said; she doesn't get the dandruff issue any more than an other "normal" horse (so it's not an allergy or fungus issue), it's just the fact that her coat color shows every speck of dust and such...I just want something that will help her look less homely right now despite my fantastic grooming skills, LOL.


    Thanks for the advice!
     
  7. patandchickens

    patandchickens Flock Mistress

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    Quote:Oh! I had misunderstood, then.

    In that case, if it's just that the look of it bothers you, try tweaking your grooming routine so that she is left looking less dusty/speckle-y. You might consider reducing the intensity/frequency of your serious currying, and see whether using a softer bristled brush helps. (e.t.a. - wash your brushes regularly!)

    Also, when you are done brushing, rub her all over with a good soft rag or towel of the type that dust clings to (I'm sorry, I can't give you a specific recommendation, it's jsut that you will find that some work a lot better than others [​IMG] Not just in the direction that the hair grows, but in all directions, circulalrly, as if you were currying sort of. Keep moving to a new clean part of the cloth as one gets dirty. Finish by stroking in the direction of the hair growth with a clean spot. It makes the horse look more presentable [​IMG]

    Have fun,

    Pat
     
    Last edited: Oct 5, 2008
  8. seminolewind

    seminolewind Flock Mistress Premium Member

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    As long as it's not too cold, I've used listerine for that on mane and tail. Worked great for me.
     
  9. PeeperKeeper

    PeeperKeeper Chillin' With My Peeps

    I don't know if they still make it. Neutragena T-gel soap. OR your vet might carry a coal tar based soap. We used to use coal tar soaps on people in the hospital with severe cases of psoriasis. Dandruff is right there in the same category and both are aggravated by cold temperatures.
     
  10. Cetawin

    Cetawin Chicken Beader

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    Ah the Emu oil will not be greasy at all...her skin and hair will absorb it and will be so much smoother.

    I completely understand the dark bay issue. My all around spoiled QH was a dark bay and she would get flaky some winters too....I used vitamin E oil on her. Back then Emu oil was not as well know or readily available.

    You can order it online and get an all natural carrier oil if you wish to stretch it out and make it last longer...apricot kernal oil, sweet almond oil, hazelnut oil etc...stick to the lightweight oils that are absorbable...not heavy oils like olive and etc. Mix the Emu oil with the carrier oil and apply. Just give it a few minutes to absorb so it does not get wiped away. [​IMG]
     

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