"Hot Wheels" the handicapped Rooster

tom0730alex

In the Brooder
5 Years
Apr 29, 2014
4
1
11
This is my first time on this website and I'm glad to be here! Here's the story of "Hot Wheels". My boyfriend and his family have always raised chickens. My boyfriends brother got some hens last year and they came with some roosters. He didn't want the roosters and knew they sent them pretty much as packing peanuts to keep the hens warm. As the roosters grew suddenly there became issues with their feet. They'd turn black and fall off and eventually the roosters would die. The company told him they were mites and that all the chickens would die. However the hens were fine and their feet were beautiful. One rooster survived his feet turning black, falling off, leaving nothing but bloody nubs and no real way for him to get around. We all felt terrible and weren't too sure what to do. We went down to the barn to check on the chickens and found the hens knocked over a pallet and had pinned the poor rooster under it. We quickly picked it up and got him situated and I began to feel empathetic for the rooster, he just couldn't catch a break. So my boyfriend and I did some research and found out that a lot of companies (terrible ones) hyper breed the roosters so they can literally use them as packing peanuts. This creates deformities, death, disease, basically animal cruelty. We found out that a common cause of hyper breeding is poor blood circulation. Poor circulation leads to frostbite in bitter cold winters and eventually necrosis of the foot or whole leg, falling off, then death. But this guy survived. So we decided to take some action! He looked tired, barely any color to his comb, and he wasn't fighting us when we picked him up, barely talking. We wrapped him up in a blanket and soaked his nubs in water and soap to wash the blood and poop. He was shaking biting the blanket and even peed himself. We put neosporin on his nubs and bandaged him up and put him in a nice comfy cage with fresh food and water. He sat with my boyfriend and they each took turns drinking water, with my boyfriend mimicking his hands as being a beak and we let him rest by the wood stove.
the next morning he was up and talking and we began the process again of changing his bandages. He already seemed to be used to us handling him as if he knew that we were helping him and didn't struggle fight or put up any fuss. His wounds already looked like they had been healing for several days and it had only been 1 day! We are continuing to keep him separate from the hens till he's all healed up and doing well!

Yes we put socks on him to keep his nubs warm! The color in his comb could still use some improvement....

There we go! He's looking bright and healthy and his nubs are all bandaged up looking just adorable! He's very social!

relaxing in the sun and on some grass actually inspired him to give his nubs a shot and walk around without the aid of his wings for balance.
 

sunny & the 5 egg layers

Crowing
8 Years
Mar 29, 2011
4,712
178
316
Sounds like you guys have done a great job rehabilitating him. Poor little guy.
Keep us updated on your roosters progress.

Handicapped chickens are very special.
 

tom0730alex

In the Brooder
5 Years
Apr 29, 2014
4
1
11
Hot Wheels is doing great. We built him up his own separate coop so he could be back with the hens and still heal. we noticed hes getting a lot better at walking around on his nubs without the aid of his wings! I'll post some more pics later!
 

Ciqala

Songster
6 Years
Apr 14, 2013
316
35
121
New Hampshire
Thanks for sharing his story, it gives hope and inspiration to me for the little gimpy legged chick I'm raising
 

Schultz

CluckN'Crow Farm
11 Years
Aug 5, 2008
3,837
25
221
Indianapolis
This is my first time on this website and I'm glad to be here! Here's the story of "Hot Wheels". My boyfriend and his family have always raised chickens. My boyfriends brother got some hens last year and they came with some roosters. He didn't want the roosters and knew they sent them pretty much as packing peanuts to keep the hens warm. As the roosters grew suddenly there became issues with their feet. They'd turn black and fall off and eventually the roosters would die. The company told him they were mites and that all the chickens would die. However the hens were fine and their feet were beautiful. One rooster survived his feet turning black, falling off, leaving nothing but bloody nubs and no real way for him to get around. We all felt terrible and weren't too sure what to do. We went down to the barn to check on the chickens and found the hens knocked over a pallet and had pinned the poor rooster under it. We quickly picked it up and got him situated and I began to feel empathetic for the rooster, he just couldn't catch a break. So my boyfriend and I did some research and found out that a lot of companies (terrible ones) hyper breed the roosters so they can literally use them as packing peanuts. This creates deformities, death, disease, basically animal cruelty. We found out that a common cause of hyper breeding is poor blood circulation. Poor circulation leads to frostbite in bitter cold winters and eventually necrosis of the foot or whole leg, falling off, then death. But this guy survived. So we decided to take some action! He looked tired, barely any color to his comb, and he wasn't fighting us when we picked him up, barely talking. We wrapped him up in a blanket and soaked his nubs in water and soap to wash the blood and poop. He was shaking biting the blanket and even peed himself. We put neosporin on his nubs and bandaged him up and put him in a nice comfy cage with fresh food and water. He sat with my boyfriend and they each took turns drinking water, with my boyfriend mimicking his hands as being a beak and we let him rest by the wood stove.
the next morning he was up and talking and we began the process again of changing his bandages. He already seemed to be used to us handling him as if he knew that we were helping him and didn't struggle fight or put up any fuss. His wounds already looked like they had been healing for several days and it had only been 1 day! We are continuing to keep him separate from the hens till he's all healed up and doing well!

Yes we put socks on him to keep his nubs warm! The color in his comb could still use some improvement....

There we go! He's looking bright and healthy and his nubs are all bandaged up looking just adorable! He's very social!

relaxing in the sun and on some grass actually inspired him to give his nubs a shot and walk around without the aid of his wings for balance.
 

drumstick diva

Still crazy after all these years.
Premium member
10 Years
Aug 26, 2009
125,443
175,890
1,857
Out to pasture
What a great story - he is a true survivor and you guys are great caregivers. I've read stories on here and have seen disabled chickens using wheel chair like devices, made out of lego's etc., to get around. Where there is a will and willing owners, there is always a way to help them out.
 

Stiggy

Songster
5 Years
Apr 29, 2014
1,186
82
161
New Zealand
Depending on the disability of the chicken, and on the care and attention that you are willing to provide depends greatly on their survival. I have a Silkie hen called Darla, she got a sinus infection that turned nasty and everyone said to just cull her, but she was a fighter and with some antibiotics, tlc and attention she got better, however the infection had taken its toll and has left her with a deformed beak that requires trimming every 2-3 weeks so that she can eat, preen herself etc properly .it also left her blind in one eye, with that eyelid drooping . however she is just a delight to have as part of my flock, and I'm glad that I put the effort into her to get her better, while being slightly disadvantaged she has made a great recovery and does everything to the standard of a normal hen . Its great to know that there are people out there who are willing to put an otherwise healthy rooster above what the average person would do and to make him a pet that is loved and cared for :)
 
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