Hova-Bator 1602 N user info ?

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by zekii, Nov 17, 2010.

  1. zekii

    zekii Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Hello,
    A friend gave me this incubator 10 years ago, it's an older model Hova-Bator 1602 N, no fan or egg tumbler, has a clear plastic water pan in the bottom with a maze of water channels. Anyone here ever use one of these to incubate successfully chicken eggs ? Any info you can pass along ? Won't be using this incubator for our initial chickens, but might consider trying to hatch some eggs eventually.

    Thanks,
    Clint [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Nov 17, 2010
  2. aprophet

    aprophet Chillin' With My Peeps

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    chesapeake Va.
    I wish you were closer I would offer to buy it I like them I have used one all season long to hatch quail with they work well for me there is a slight learning curve I just hatched a few seramas twice now I have 7 at this point 4 5 weeks old and 3 less then 1 week old . I have had several 100% quail hatches this last serama hatch was 75%
     
  3. gumbii

    gumbii Chillin' With My Peeps

    Oct 7, 2010
    bell gardens, ca
    how do you manually turn them... i'm thinking about burrowing one and using it for my OEGB eggs...
     
  4. PunkinPeep

    PunkinPeep Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I use one like that, and i have had great (96%) hatch rates in it. I will tell you, though, that i don't bother with those channels in the bottom for water. I just use wet rags, and it has worked out well.

    I also incubate and hatch in egg cartons. It is easy to turn them just but alternating which side of the carton is leaned up on something. It has worked great and painlessly. I am expecting to hear cheep cheeping out of mine any moment now.
     
  5. zekii

    zekii Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:Using egg cartons to hold the eggs seems like a good idea, but I'm not quit sure what you mean by "alternating which side of the carton is leaned up on something" ? How are you using the cartons...just one side, and remove the top ?
    What are you leaning the carton against ? Using egg cartons the eggs would face vertical, I've been reading the eggs should lie horizontal....so maybe you can elaborate a little on you egg carton hatching technique...and of course a picture usually can answer a lot of questions.

    [​IMG]
     
  6. ginbart

    ginbart Overrun With Chickens

    Mar 9, 2008
    Bloomsburg, PA
    Put your eggs in the carton with the large end up. You take tho top off the carton and if you can put some holes around the sides on the bottom. I use a little piece of wood it's only a one inch square by about 4 inches long. Place it under one side. The long way like it would be under 6 eggs. It only takes a minute to move the wood from one side to the other. I can get 3 cartons in the bator. Hope that helps. I'd show you a pic but I have no battery's for my camera.
     
  7. PunkinPeep

    PunkinPeep Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:Using egg cartons to hold the eggs seems like a good idea, but I'm not quit sure what you mean by "alternating which side of the carton is leaned up on something" ? How are you using the cartons...just one side, and remove the top ?
    What are you leaning the carton against ? Using egg cartons the eggs would face vertical, I've been reading the eggs should lie horizontal....so maybe you can elaborate a little on you egg carton hatching technique...and of course a picture usually can answer a lot of questions.

    [​IMG]

    I've looked, and it seems that i don't have a picture of my set-up. I would take one, but my chicks are in mid-hatch right now, so that will have to wait. Let me see if i can describe my set-up clearly.

    I have found that it works well in this size incubator to incubate 24 eggs at once. I cut the tops off of two of the paper/cardboard egg cartons to use the bottoms to hold eggs. You can either leave them whole or cut them apart so you have 4 sections of 6 spots each. I have done it both ways. The eggs are placed vertically, fat side up, in the egg cartons.

    In the middle of the incubator, i place one of the carton tops. This is the "something" i use to lean my egg cartons on. So basically, if i have two egg carton bottoms, holding 12 eggs each, i will prop one long side of each egg carton bottom up on the egg carton top that is in the middle of the 'bator. Place them so that the eggs are turned at roughly a 45 degree angle. When it's time to "turn" the eggs, just switch the positions of the two egg carton bottoms. Then they will be leaning in an opposite direction.

    I put the wet rags that i use for hydration close to the edges of the inside of the 'bator, on top of the grate, so that they're easy to access but don't get the egg cartons wet. I set my hygrometer on the egg carton top that is in the middle, and i balance my tiny thermometer on top of the eggs.

    When it comes time for lock down, i remove the egg carton top from the bottom, place the egg carton bottoms, full of eggs, against the walls of the 'bator and move the hydration cloths to the middle. This way, if i feel it's getting to dry in there, i can pour water onto the rags, through one of the vent holes in the lid, and i don't have to open the incubator.

    As to the position of the eggs, it is my understanding that the big hatcheries use egg turners that keep the eggs in this same position, as do many automatic egg turners that you can get for our little home incubators. It does seem helpful (just from my reading here on byc) that you keep the eggs in the same position during incubation as you wish to hatch them in. Meaning, if you want to hatch in cartons, incubate in cartons - and vice versa. Switching positions for hatch (from vertical to horizontal or from horizontal to vertical) appears to sometimes cause problems.

    One other thing i do, that you didn't really ask about, is to put some of the puffy shelf covering (the kind that's kind of full of holes) on top of the grate. This helps with clean-up, since it's machine washable, and it's also nicer for the chicks to walk on than the grate.

    I hope this helps. I'm happy to answer any questions. I hope i described this well. A picture would definitely help. I'll try to remedy that after this hatch is over.
     
  8. zekii

    zekii Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Ok...thanks for the description on how you are using this type of incubator, and now I understand what you mean about leaning
    the egg carton propped up on one side then the other using either a piece of wood or the top of the egg carton. I guess I was under the assumption that you had to actually turn the eggs, not just tilt them from one side to the other, but this method is
    definitely easier than manipulating each egg [​IMG]

    What have you found to be good amount of time to turn the eggs each day ? & what humidity & temp settings are you
    trying to maintain ?

    Using either a sponge or rags to maintain the humidity would be easier than keeping those channels filled with water in the bottom of the incubator...thanks for this hint.

    I'll do alot more reading before I start hatching some eggs, but at least now I have a pretty good idea how I am going to
    use my old Hova-Bator to try and hatch some eggs...appreciate all the good ideas & hints...thanks a bunch !!

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    ClinT
     
  9. PunkinPeep

    PunkinPeep Chillin' With My Peeps

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    SouthEast Texas
    I turn them every 8 hours - or something close to that. I'm especially diligent the first 7 days, when it is easier for the embryo to become attached to one wall.

    There is a sticky in this section that has a link to a discussion about dry incubation. It's very long but worth the read. I took my hints from that and have had great results. I keep it about 50-55% humidity but don't freak out if it dries out down as low as 25%. Then i try not to let it get any higher than 60% for hatching.

    My methods changed some this time. With very different weather, my humidity has been hard to keep low. Everything is as adjustment, including where you live, so it might take some experimentation.

    Here's a link to page 3 of that discussion i mentioned -where some of the really interesting information starts.

    https://www.backyardchickens.com/forum/viewtopic.php?id=113681&p=3
     
  10. zekii

    zekii Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:Punkinpeep...this thread you lead me too is excellent, thanks very much for all you hints & info, I'll post my hatching experience here once I get my 1st eggs in the Hova-Bator

    [​IMG]
     

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