Hovabator Genesis 1588 - problem

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by FarmerWife, Jan 7, 2015.

  1. FarmerWife

    FarmerWife Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Oct 27, 2010
    Good morning,
    I bought my daughter a Hovabator Genesis 1588, the information that came with it say's it's pre set, stupid, stupid, stupid me, I believed them. I think something isn't right, and I don't have another thermometer to check. It came pre set at 100, and say's to keep the humidity at 65%, which it's holding. I had a little fluctuation when I removed the egg turner the other night, yesterday was day 21. We have four eggs with pips, since yesterday. No chicks have emerged, one has opened more than half way around, it was that way last evening. This morning I got up to check, hoping to find at least one chick out, but no further progress from any of them. I know I'm not supposed to open the bator, but I did, to check the egg that was most opened, and the membrane felt dry!!!!! So I assume the temps are not what the digital readings say they are. I have no idea what to do at this point, and I hate to lose those chicks!!! Please help if you can. Thank you.

    Dianna
     
  2. rainbowrooster

    rainbowrooster Chillin' With My Peeps

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    At this point go ahead and help the 4 chicks from the shell. If you don't they will die anyways. Get another thermometer to double check temp before setting any more eggs. Look up the dry incubation method. To much humidity can be disastrous too.
     
  3. Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner Chicken Obsessed

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    Northwest Arkansas
    You need to calibrate your thermometer and hygrometer to know what you are actually dealing with. Factory presets are not always right with any incubator or any instrument you may buy. These might help.

    Calibrate a Thermometer
    http://www.allfoodbusiness.com/calibrating_thermometers.php
    Rebel’s Thermometer Calibration
    http://cmfarm.us/ThermometerCalibration.html
    Rebel’s Hygrometer Calibration
    http://cmfarm.us/HygrometerCalibration.html

    There are many different reasons eggs may be as much as a couple of days early or late. It’s not always temperature but temperature does paly a big role. Since yours are pipping about on time, your temperature is probably pretty close.

    Humidity is a lot harder to talk about than temperature. For many different reasons different humidities work for different ones of us. That’s more of a trial and error type thing. Even the professionals that use incubators holding 60,000 or more eggs have to do some experimenting to find the optimal humidity for that specific incubator in that specific place. Just moving that incubator across the room can mean you need to re-tune that incubator to find the sweet spot. The good news is that you normally have a wide range of humidity that works pretty well. You don’t always have to hit the humidity perfectly. That sweet spot is fairly wide.

    Now to your particular situation. Before a chick hatches it has to do a lot of things. It has to absorb the yolk, dry up blood vessels it no longer needs and absorb that blood, do something with that gunk it has been living in so it dries nice and fluffy instead of the down plastered down, learn to breathe air instead of live in a liquid environment, and who knows what else. Some chicks do a lot of this before external pip. These usually don’t take a lot of time before they zip and hatch. Some wait until after external pip to do a lot of these things. As you know this can drive us crazy with worry. I’ve had several take longer than 24 hours after external pip until zip and hatch. Usually when a chick starts to zip it finishes and hatches but often they will stop to rest a bit before continuing. It is really hard to know when a chick is in trouble or if it is just slow. One absolutely sure sign. If you see a yellow fluid coming from the pip hole the chick is in big trouble. You don’t have any time to waste.

    It is possible that you can shrink wrap a chick by opening the incubator after external pip. It is possible but that does not mean it happens each and every time. Often it does not happen but since it is possible it is best not to unless you have a strong reason to do it. That’s just good practice. That dry membrane doesn’t have anything to do with temperature, it’s due to humidity, both during incubation and during lockdown.

    Since you have opened the incubator I suggest you take that egg out. When you open the incubator to do that, lightly mist the other eggs with lukewarm water to help keep them from drying out. Don’t soak them where you drown the chick but just a light mist. Then after you close the incubator, carefully start to take the shell off. If you see any blood, stop immediately. Slowly and carefully. Blood means the chick has not absorbed the blood vessels and is not ready to hatch. Mist the membrane and put it back in the incubator.

    If it does not bleed, very carefully remove the shell and the membrane. If the chick is alive, dunk it in a cup of warm water (lukewarm, around 100 degrees) to rinse off some of that gunk. Do not put the head under water so you drown it. Just rise the worst of the gunk off. If a few small chunks of shell still remain, that’s not a big deal. All you are trying to do is rinse enough gunk off so that the chick can move once it dries off. Some down will still be plastered down when it dries. That’s not a problem, it will go away in about a week. You just want the chick to be able to move when it dries. Then put the chick in the brooder under the light so it can dry off. Be careful not to chill the chick getting it to the brooder.

    Use your judgment on what to do with the other eggs.

    A lot of chicks that we help don’t make it. They may just not be strong enough to hatch on their own even if conditions are perfect. They may have something wrong with them internally. We may injure or chill them by trying to help. I wish you luck!
     
  4. FarmerWife

    FarmerWife Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Oct 27, 2010
    Hi,
    One chick died in the shell, and I flicked away little pieces of shell to finish the circle they had already begun with two of them, and peeled the membrane, no blood. I tried to make it so they came out of the shell on their own when they were ready to, and they did after a little while. One is completely dry, and has come free of the cord, and the other is also out, and dry, but still trying to get the cord to break free. Both seem very active, I hope that's the way they will stay. The other, is weak, I just did the same thing I did with the other two, but have not removed it from it's shell. It's breathing, but looks weak and tired. I have a feeling that one will not make it. I should have known better than to trust the settings, it said it was ready to go. I'm really upset about losing my chicks, I know it's trial and error with a new incubator, but it doesn't make it any better. I did order two more thermometers, one digital, and one analog. I'll never trust the digital reading on the incubator again, poor chicks. I'll feel guilty about this for a while. Thank you for your information, and advice, I will definitely read the links. I hope these two that are moving about right now make it. So far they look good, time will tell. In the mean time I'm going to give them some Sav-A-Chick when they're ready to drink. Have a good day, thank you again.

    Dianna
     
  5. FarmerWife

    FarmerWife Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Oct 27, 2010
    Well, I have three chicks, one is very alert and healthy, the other two not so good. One is very weak, and the other can't seem to walk, it kind of tries to, but it can't. It flaps around sort of. If it lives, does anyone know if it will go away? It's lively, not as much as the healthy one, but lively. The healthy one is pecking around and eating, not the other two. I'll probably lose those two, but I've got to try to keep them alive if I can. I'm giving the healthy one Sav-A-Chick , the one who flaps around, and the weak one, I dip their beaks just barely so they can drink. I'm not going to cull them, if they're going to pass, they're going to do it on their own. They don't appear to be in pain, I'm keeping them warm on a heating pad, they like to cuddle with each other. So, what do you think is wrong with the one that can't walk? Is that common? Have any of you had a chick hatch like that? Sorry for all the dumb questions, this one is a first for me. Thanks in advance.

    Dianna
     

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