How are you eating your duck eggs?

Discussion in 'Ducks' started by KARy408, Sep 1, 2014.

  1. KARy408

    KARy408 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    This is a call to all the foodies out there! It seems to me there are far too few people eating duck eggs these days (at least here in the US). I don't think most people realize how amazingly delicious they are. So, I want to start an #eatmoreduckeggs movement, and I thought this might be a good place to get things going.

    How are you eating your duck eggs? What do you like or dislike about them? Have you found any recipes that are better or worse with duck eggs? Any amazing tips to share?

    Personally I find that poached and boiled duck eggs really shine!

    I'll eat them just about any way, but I do think they taste the most different from chicken eggs fried- not bad just firmer around the whites. Overall though I think the yokes are richer and lend a more luscious texture to however you're using them.

    I made an egg salad this weekend using 2 chicken and 4 duck eggs that was fantastic! I did have to leave the duck eggs in the water a bit longer than the chicken eggs, since they're larger.
    [​IMG]

    I also made chocolate chip cookies and noticed they came out "fluffier" than when I make the same recipe with chicken eggs. Tried to capture it here:
    [​IMG]

    The mayo we made with Duck yokes is out-of-this world! It took us 3 attempts to finally get it right, but I think that was due more to my husband's insistence on "cheating" with a food processor. Once we gave in to old fashion elbow grease and broke out the wisk, it came together perfectly! Look how yellow it is compared to the commercial stuff!
    [​IMG]

    Anyway, what do you all think? I'd love to hear how you are using your eggs and see your pics! Let's all eat more duck eggs!
     
    Last edited: Sep 1, 2014
  2. Onlyducks

    Onlyducks Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I use them in baking frequently. I also use them in crustless quiche (very good that way). Boiling or steaming works, but they are a huge challenge to use boiled due to peeling poorly. I've used three week old eggs and they still did not peel well. They do make excellent egg salad and deviled eggs if you can get them to peel. Basically, I use them wherever I used chicken eggs, adjusting the amount due to larger size. I also use them in the homemade dog food for my pomeranian.
     
  3. KARy408

    KARy408 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thanks for sharing OnlyDucks!

    They are a pain to peel boiled, but I find that it helps a lot if you wait till they are about room temp again and then peel them under the faucet, letting the cool water get down in between the skin and egg white, flicking off the shell as you go. If I'm patient and do it this way I can get a mostly smooth egg out.
     
  4. Onlyducks

    Onlyducks Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 16, 2014
    As noted, I have tried virtually every method, including peeling under running water, starting hot, starting cold, boiling, steaming, plunging into ice water. peeling when barely cool, peeling when completely cool…..Yes, I have eaten many boiled/steamed duck eggs! As long as I'm not going for deviled eggs, I just peel them and whatever I get, I get. I think it's because the membrane on duck eggs adheres more securely to the egg insides than with chickens. Also, it does require a great deal of patience and my patience with uncooperative eggs is sometimes pretty short! (Duck eggs are also harder to crack open and the whites are very stringy compared to chicken eggs. When I go back to chicken eggs, I have to remember not to hit them as hard on the side of bowl or they get pretty smashed!)

    I also wonder how old eggs one buys in the store are. I have a similar problem with boiling farm-raised chicken eggs. Last dozen, half were okay for deviled eggs, half were not and these were at least three weeks old. The ones I get in the store usually peel quite well.
     
  5. Sfraker

    Sfraker Chillin' With My Peeps

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    We just started getting eggs so I haven't had much chance to experiment. I've only boiled, scrambled and made egg salad and deviled eggs. All were delicious!

    I need to learn how to make omelets. I LOVE them but have never tried to make one myself.

    I brought deviled eggs into work. It was funny to see how many people were surprised that they tasted like eggs! LOL!!! [​IMG]
     
  6. Jemmie

    Jemmie Out Of The Brooder

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    I've fried them over-easy and poached them. Thick, yummy warm egg yolks. I've also boiled them and scrambled them, with a little butter, milk and basil. I've also made omelets.

    The local store in town has an organic section and sells duck eggs for $9.99 a dozen!

    I'm getting about 4 duck eggs daily at the moment but expect that to increase soon enough.
     
  7. KARy408

    KARy408 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    This is awesome! Thanks all for sharing!

    Jemmie - I've seen places online that sell duck eggs up to $6 a piece! My theory is that since you can't really get them in the grocery store today, it's mostly only high end/specialty chefs and caterers buying them, so they get away with the high price. I'm really hoping this will start to change. Not that we shouldn't be charging high end prices for our eggs, but I do think they could stand to be priced a bit lower to get them into more home cook's hands. I think as foodie culture continues to grow, more people will want to try duck eggs! Same as how people are now trying alternative cuts of meat and/or non-traditional proteins.

    Sfraker- Omlets are not too difficult, the flip is the hardest part! Just try to keep you pan well oiled. I find a silicone spatulas helps as well. Start out like you're making scrambled eggs, but don't stir them up once in the pan. Instead let the egg mixture spread out and coat the surface. Wait a minute or so, then carefully flip. Add your filling ingredients to 1 half side, then fold the other half on top. Wha-law! Once you get really good at it, you can use less eggs and try it more thinned out, for a lighter, crepe-like Omlet.

    Isn't it silly the strange perceptions people have?! I had a co-worker who was really turned off by the noticeably larger yoke in a duck egg. So I started giving her the ones with double yokes, as she found the two smaller yokes more palatable than 1 large one!

    What other strange misconceptions have you all run into regarding duck eggs?
     
  8. Quackers Mama

    Quackers Mama Chillin' With My Peeps

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    @KARy408 Mind sharing some recipes? :)
     
  9. KARy408

    KARy408 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Of course! Anything specific you're looking for, or are you referencing my first post?

    I used Alton Brown's mayo recipe, as he's one of my go-to's for the traditional staples-
    http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/alton-brown/mayonnaise-recipe.html
    *On our batch yesterday, we scaled down the vinegar a bit, and added a dash of cayenne pepper to our taste preference.

    The egg salad recipe was a riff on this one from my favorite food blog-
    http://www.101cookbooks.com/archives/001575.html
    *I used 2 LG chicken eggs and 4 small-ish (tho still larger than chicken) duck eggs. Chicken eggs came out of the pot at 7 mins per the recipe, we kept the Duck eggs in for 10 mins total. Also I start with room temp (not cool) water when beginning the boil with my backyard eggs (which reminds me, I've been meaning to write in to the blog about this). I used our fresh mayo and a bit less celery, and added a little dill to my salad.

    A side note, I'm starting to find it helpful to categorize my duck eggs by size. I generally get two; Small = LG/XLG Chicken egg. Then Large = Jumbo/Dino Egg, does not fit in an egg carton and is usually double yoked. I'm now saving the small eggs for baking and precise recipes, while using the double yoker's for fried eggs, omlets, French toast etc.
     
  10. KARy408

    KARy408 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    This is a fun recipe I posted somewhere else, for a user who doesn't like the taste of eggs and was looking for ways to "hide" them-

    Take 1 banana and mash it up really good, add 1 egg and a good pinch of salt and mix to form a batter. Then pan fry in a little butter or oil, a minute or two per side.

    It's basically gluten-free banana pancakes. We get about 4 small cakes per 1 Banana/Egg combo.
     

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