How Bad is Cedar, Really?

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by scrambledmess, May 10, 2009.

  1. scrambledmess

    scrambledmess Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sep 26, 2008
    NW Ohio
    Okay, DH was trying to be good. He bought a big beautiful dog house that he is converting into a small coop. I knew he was going to do something like this, but I wasn't exactly sure what it would be. I saw it in the yard when I got home from work this morning.... It looks like this:

    http://images.lowes.com/product/converted/752113/752113052086md.jpg

    Umm.. It is cedar and it is put together already. Which means I don't think we can take it back. And I think it would crush him for me to tell him we can't use it. Any suggestions?

    There are windows on both sides that have chicken wire in place. There is also additional ventalation under the edges of the roof. Is taht enough ventaliation to make the cedar not toxic?

    We will never have a reason to close up this coop for warmth. Even at our coldest it isn't below freezing.
     
  2. trilyn

    trilyn Chillin' With My Peeps

    Apr 13, 2009
    East Syracuse
    From what I've gathered reading other posts on cedar, it is the shavings that cause problems. Hope this helps! [​IMG]
     
  3. Poulets De Cajun

    Poulets De Cajun Overrun With Chickens

    It's actually the oils and stuff in Cedar shavings that are supposed to cause respiratory problems. With that being said, if you have adequate ventilation in the coop, and they aren't confined to the inside at all times, they should be fine. Cedar shavings are a little more dangerous because they roll around in them and the dust from the shavings can cause problems. I dont think the walls and structure would harm them.
     
  4. xtremevermonter

    xtremevermonter Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 3, 2009
    Bradford, VT
    I agree with the to posts above me. It seems that the shavings are the problem and not the actual wood which the chickens will leave alone. On the plus side, cedar is a rot and pest resistant wood that should last a long time outside. Your coop looks great! [​IMG]
     
  5. Pitchfork

    Pitchfork Out Of The Brooder

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    Apr 11, 2008
    Oklahoma
    I used cedar 2x4's for the framing of my coop/run because of its rot resistance and it is lighter than treated lumber and not as subject to twisting and warping, as are a lot of treated wood.
    Have seen no problems with the chickens.
     
  6. scrambledmess

    scrambledmess Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sep 26, 2008
    NW Ohio
    Thank you all for your replies. I feel much better now [​IMG]
     
  7. shawnkfl

    shawnkfl Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 30, 2009
    christiansburg, VA
    you could always paint the inside too. just say it's for easier cleaning [​IMG]
     
  8. scrambledmess

    scrambledmess Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sep 26, 2008
    NW Ohio
    We lined the bottom with plexi glass type things. I suggested painting it on the inside. We may still do that. Thanks again.
     

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