How best to turn eggs when facing pointy end down!

Discussion in 'New Member Introductions' started by Blakmage, Mar 22, 2013.

  1. Blakmage

    Blakmage Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 22, 2013
    Belfast, Ireland
    Hi all from Ireland!
    I'm having a small issue with research. I got a small incubator the other day and I'm doing my homework before I get eggs to incubate, just so I give them the best chance possible. My incubator only holds 7 eggs. 6 in a little circle and 1 in the middle. It's so small and the tray is designed so I can only put them pointy end completely down. I've read that putting them on their sides is better and turning a necessity, but with them pointy end down, I'm not sure how best to turn them. Diagrams would be vital and advice very welcomed as I don't seem to be able to get my head around the idea at all. Any light someone could shed on this issue would be greatly appreciated. I'd happily repay them with lots of pictures of chicks they helped bring into the world! :)
     
  2. budpayne

    budpayne Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 17, 2013
    what kind of incubator do you have
     
  3. Trefoil

    Trefoil Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sorry, I can't do diagrams but the concept is simple. When you incubate eggs pointy end down, one way of turning is to tip the incubator by putting something under one side, then removing it and then putting it under the other side. This is basically how the king suro turns eggs,, and it works.
     
  4. Fred's Hens

    Fred's Hens Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

    Incubating upright, with the pointed end down and fat end up, is a very acceptable practice. Many people are embracing the use of an egg carton, which also holds them up and down.

    When you incubate and hatch with the egg upright, you don't "turn" them in a conventional way. You tilt them back and forth instead. Actually, you tilt the entire machine back and forth, three or four times per day. Use a thick book or a 6 cm thick piece of wood and use it to gently, gently tilt the incubator itself. First right, then left. Think the Leaning Bell Tower of Pisa.

    At day 18, stop with the tilting. You can choose to get into the incubator and lay the egg down, or just leave them in their upright position, add your water and wet sponge, open your air vents a bit wider, and for the last 3 days and leave it be.

    Anyhow, I hope that helps. This is done all the time and with success. Just keep your heat rock steady at 38 C and out of daylight and extreme changes in ambient room temperatures.
     
  5. Blakmage

    Blakmage Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 22, 2013
    Belfast, Ireland
    [​IMG]

    This is what it looks like. I put fridge eggs in it for aesthetic purposes. Any advice?

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  6. Fred's Hens

    Fred's Hens Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

    Now that we've seen your incubator, I would recommend a somewhat less severe tilt. I'd probably use a book about 2 cm thick for the tilting purposes. I'd probably rotate the tilt North, South, East and West. Each day. 4-5 hour increments.

    You'll have to leave them upright to hatch. There is no choice. That will be just fine.
     
  7. Blakmage

    Blakmage Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 22, 2013
    Belfast, Ireland
    Thanks a million guys. All that advice will help heaps. I don't know why I didn't think of tilting the whole machine!!
    The only problem is the design dictates where I put the water for humidity. There is a dipped ring all around the fan for water and I have to be careful not to get water into the electronics or it will apparently cause irreparable damage. I'm going to have to use bits of sponge to keep that from happening.

    Lesson learned. I will definitely be looking into an incubator with a better design in the future. In the meantime, when i get eggs and attempt hatching, I will post some pics. Thanks everyone!!
     
  8. redsoxs

    redsoxs Chicken Obsessed

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    Greetings, Blakmage, and [​IMG]! Great to have you here! Best of luck to you and happy hatching!
     
  9. Fred's Hens

    Fred's Hens Chicken Obsessed Premium Member


    Actually, most people have gone to "dry" incubating. In other words, a Broody Hen doesn't add water. She just uses the relative humidity of the environment. If your air is already 40-50% relative humidity or more, then no water is needed. The only time you really need to worry about adding humidity is during the last 3 days preceding hatch. At that point, you're no longer tilting the eggs anyhow. So, you see? It's pretty basic. I would imagine Ireland has plenty enough relative humidity, but just be advised that wood stove's can lower inside house humidity.
     
  10. rockinpaints

    rockinpaints Chillin' With My Peeps

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    [​IMG] Cheers from Ohio! [​IMG]Glad you could join us! [​IMG]
     

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